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Land Warrior trials results at Ft. Polk


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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Rollstoy:

How hard is it to jam a GPS signal?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I am more worried about any device that transmits. Walking around with all this computer gear that trasmits will someday be a way for the enemy to track you.

Cav

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CavScout:

I am more worried about any device that transmits. Walking around with all this computer gear that trasmits will someday be a way for the enemy to track you.

Cav

Someday?! Someday is now. If you use a cell phone they can already locate you. Granted not with any great amount of accuracy, but they can tell which "cell" your phone is located in.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

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From what they say about the radio gear, I wouldn't worry too much about enemy DF (direction finding). It sounds like it's UHF or SHF with really low power given the LOS and range issues. To lock in a radio signal, you need at least 2 DF stations and preferably 3 or more. All these DF'ers have to be networked in some way so that they generate a LOB (line of bearing) at the exact same time to ensure they're looking at the same radio transmitter. Even if the radio range is extended out to 1Km, the DFers would need to be within that range and have LOS to receive the signals, which is WAY too close for my comfort (we intelligence weenies do like our comforts, you know smile.gif ). Still, I suppose getting a single LOB is better than not knowing anything about your enemy's whereabouts.

GPS would be pretty easy to jam (known frequency and LONG distance between transmitter and receiver), but jamming is a two-edged sword. You would lose the use of GPS for your own forces, too. Still, we (101st MI Bn, 1st ID) used to have some 20W disposable VHF broadband jammers that would have been good for 'fuzzying' an area if the frequency was adjusted for GPS.

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Canada: Where men were men, unless they were horses.

-Dudley Do-right

[This message has been edited by IntelWeenie (edited 09-22-2000).]

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The Russians have a "Glonass" GPS jammer system on the market. There's been some experimenting with it at NTC.

RE: The signal output from the Landwarrior system. One of the big tweaks they did to the system was improve the shielding to cut down on spill over emmissions. It was one of the big problems found in initial testing. There's a fine line they have to walk bewteen this emmissions spill over and range of the comms.

Though when you are talking battalions of guys walking around masking emmissions is less of an issue. There's no secret that you are there, however one would need to be able to set your systems and operational procedures to conform to different EMCON levels. It's certainly all very sci-fi. Pretty soon real soldiers will have all the same information that your typical CM player does! smile.gif Now where's that power armor?

Los

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Rollstoy:

How hard is it to jam a GPS signal?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually the US Army version of the GPS can not be spoofed by false/enemy transmissions.

The security feature built in to the GPS receiver has an encryption device that only allows it to receive friendly encrypted sattelite transmissions.

As for jamming.....well if the enemy has enough balls to try and jam the entire battle field of GPS receivers, and especially encrypted sattelite transmissions, their gonna be toast anyway. smile.gif

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The counter-revolution,

people smilling through their tears.

Who can give them back their lives, and all those wasted years.

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Land Warrior is using COTS wireless LAN hardware, with converters to shift from the 2.4 GHz band to a different frequency. At least, they were the last time I checked.

I'm actually developing software that's being evaluated for use in the next iteration of the LW software. [We're also hoping the Army will be interested in procuring a version of it separately as a lightweight, low-cost alternative to get somethinginto soldiers' hands before LW is available for all (which will probably be sometime between 2005 and never).]

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Leland J. Tankersley

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DEF BUNGIS:

As for jamming.....well if the enemy has enough balls to try and jam the entire battle field of GPS receivers, and especially encrypted sattelite transmissions, their gonna be toast anyway. smile.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thus disposable jammers. They are too hard to locate (either by sight or DF since you usually use a lot of them) and are deliverable to the enemy's rear area by artillery, aircraft or Special Forces. MoJam (mobile jamming) is another answer, since DFing moving tartgets is harder.

Encryption has no effect on jamming. Encrypted signals are still radio signals, just ones you can't understand. Jamming frequency hopping radios is another matter, but you can still do broadband jamming though you typically loose some (or a lot)effectiveness.

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Canada: Where men were men, unless they were horses.

-Dudley Do-right

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by IntelWeenie:

Thus disposable jammers. They are too hard to locate (either by sight or DF since you usually use a lot of them) and are deliverable to the enemy's rear area by artillery, aircraft or Special Forces. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

That's really cool. GPS jammers by way of artillery. It's like we're living in the future. Anything else they can deliver by artillery other than nukes, chemical weapons, or explosives?

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>>>>>>>>>> Anything else they can deliver by artillery other than nukes, chemical weapons, or explosives? <<<<<<<<<<

Basically, anything small enough to fit inside the shell and that can survive the shock of it all. Arty has conventional HE, WP, smoke, illume, nuke, gas, laser-guided AT shells, submunitions of many types (AT, AP, both, and AT and AP mines), various types of electronic devices you want in badguy territory, leaflets, and cannister, just to name what pops into my head immediately.

Arty has also been used to resupply cut-off units with small, fairly durable, critical items. For example, in the WW2 battle of Mortain, they fired various things to the US troops on the mountain, especially radio batteries. This wasn't particularly successful but I think we could do that better today.

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-Bullethead

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Guest Michael emrys

<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Pham911:

Anything else they can deliver by artillery other than nukes, chemical weapons, or explosives?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Big, black, hairy spiders that climb onto your face at night.

Michael

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