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Rankorian

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About Rankorian

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    Senior Member
  • Birthday 09/18/1958

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  • Location
    Worcester, MA
  • Occupation
    Physician

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  1. Combatintman, I was always surprised by the lack of comment on scenarios, also. I tried to get something going about them in Red Thunder--unsuccessfully. My approach to the scenarios is to start with the smallest and work up. With that strategy, I got to Assault, and not even to the end of that scenario, in RT. My suggestion--made with perhaps annoying persistence--is that they include tiny scenarios, as in 2-3 units on each side, to hook people in. It could be "StarCraft" style, adding new units with successive scenarios, and with some [fictional--though ideally based on
  2. Are we guaranteed that all the footage seen was from that offensive? What is the tank at approximately 1:41? There is some "stuff" behind the turret--a rectangular bulge--which looks non-WW2.
  3. Just finished watching the video of the first battle. To state what is likely obvious: you are very good at this stuff. That you "happen" to have the right stuff in the right place when the unexpected occurs is no accident.
  4. BTW, I think this is the most succinct, well-written paragraph in the post. In some manner, one could drop this right into someplace in the manual.
  5. Yes. This and what ME and YankeeDog provide below (in addition to others) is very helpful. Indeed, given the OP concern, I was essentially baiting you all to provide that information. I did not realize, JasonC, the relative scarcity of Radios in the German army in 1944. I had picked them as an example (rather than the Soviets) thinking they were more like the US at that time. But, of course, cart transport was still significant for the Germans in 1944, so I should have been more savvy--also, as noted below, there seem to be more radios than you describe in-game--I did not realize the
  6. [Well...I just brought my wife over to the computer to read the nice comments. She has no idea what she is reading, but she can tell I am, unaccountably, pleased] So let me ask a super-grog type of question as to real life. Situation: It is 1944. A small German infantry force, with three attached MkIVs are to assault a building complex. You are the squad closest to the friendly armor, which is about 200-400 meters away. Things are not going exactly to plan, or, you want the armor to fire at specific enemy location. By good fortune, both your squad and the friendly armor has a r
  7. [Well...I just brought my wife over to the computer to read the nice comments. She has no idea what she is reading, but she can tell I am, unaccountably, pleased] So let me ask a super-grog type of question as to real life. Situation: It is 1944. A small German infantry force, with three attached MkIVs are to assault a building complex. You are the squad closest to the friendly armor, which is about 200-400 meters away. Things are not going exactly to plan, or, you want the armor to fire at specific enemy location. By good fortune, both your squad and the friendly armor has a r
  8. My understanding is this: The scout can share the spotting with your tanks IF it is connected by C2 to the units above it, and if the tanks by C2 to the units above it, and one of those higher level units are the same. The spotting information goes up the chain of command from the scout, and then down to the tank. There is a time delay in passing that spotting information. A radio can help keep those communication links. (as in: Radios don't pass spotting information, people do, and sometimes the radio helps) But, at the risk of stepping into the military experts area, in the time f
  9. PT, in all deference, as we are prone to write on this forum: I tried to read your defense of the difficulty--it is way too long for me to, enjoyably, read. Don't you (and this may be an issue) want to be enjoyable? As a former competitive chess player, MD with a Harvard medical sub-specialty degree, who took three semesters of calculus, reads the Economist, the New Yorker, and reads about particle physics..... And has played war sims since the 1960s, including all the ones you described in your post (I think), I am going to give the opinion: YOUR CAMPAIGNS ARE TOO HARD. PERIO
  10. Could we, perhaps, have a sense of how much time remains in the scenario, and the casualty/remaining forces count? There is a interesting punch/counterpunch going on--with an interesting, floating, incomplete front line. But I am losing the overall context of how the battle is going.
  11. Your AARs are effective: I am drawn to the game each time you do one. A scenario designer question: Did the French make any horrible mistakes in this campaign, historically? And if they did, how does one model that, or one does not even try? There must be some judgment issues here. Theoretically, anything other than a crushing German victory would, historically, be a great French victory. But it is like the "Sedan" factor in the initial WW2 invasion of France, you can't unwrite a surprise--no French WW2 player is going to march the bulk of his forces into the low countries. How does on
  12. The Entente have scattered attacks. The Germans are on interior lines. That means the Germans are about to concentrate on ............ and destroy (or try to destroy) the enemy, then move to the next area. I think we are close to finding out where ........... is.
  13. Again, a wonderful AAR. But as far as reality, is it correct that the Germans have the upper hand? I thought they were to be fighting a fighting withdrawal, but they seem, at this point, to be going almost toe to toe with the Entente. Can you remind us of the victory conditions?
  14. Bill, Those ambushes are very interesting. I will also argue that they represent a very old tactical strategy, which this game system shows better than most: induce the enemy to rush forward, in low supply, non-fortified, and in less than optimum organization, then ambush those "victorious" units. That tactic is, I am sure, pre-Roman. The weapons may change, but the idea is the same. Again, with the supply issues, and the deadliness on mass surprise concentration of units, a relatively simple game mechanics simulates reality beautifully. I will be getting Breakthrough as soon as I
  15. Utterly fascinating AAR. And the pictures give it a rich flavor. If it is not out of place, I have a technical question: How does one scout toward a position with a single unit, then seeing it is strong, pull that unit back?
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