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The 'Never Say You've Seen It All' Thread

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6 hours ago, SLIM said:

I think the Hubble Deep Field Survey did more to alter our perception of the universe than anything following the discovery of the spherical earth.

 

Here's something cool, I don't know if I posted this around here before. Who knew gasoline could be so interesting?

Among other things, of course:

 

That actually was a pretty good talk. Interesting dress code, on the other hand.

 

6 minutes ago, Sgt.Squarehead said:

More drone-hunting options are appearing:

Still prefer the Dutch system myself.  ;)

 

Would you believe I work on stuff like the one in the video @Sgt.Squarehead? Thanks for the video it was very interesting.

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Optionally, there's the 'Throw Zillions At It" technique:

http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/the-army-will-finally-be-able-to-blast-drones-with-lase-1793383695

Based on what I've seen so far I'd still choose the Eagle.....I've not flown a Bald Eagle, but I've flown other Eagles.  First thing you are told when you take the bird, do not be deceived by the gloves, if this bird gets upset it will drive its talons through them like chamois and bury them into you so deep they cross in the middle.  :o

 

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3 minutes ago, Sgt.Squarehead said:

Optionally, there's the 'Throw Zillions At It" technique:

http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/the-army-will-finally-be-able-to-blast-drones-with-lase-1793383695

Based on what I've seen so far I'd still choose the Eagle.....I've not flown a Bald Eagle, but I've flown other Eagles.  First thing you are told when you take the bird, do not be deceived by the gloves, if this bird gets upset it will drive its talons through them like chamois and bury them into you so deep they cross in the middle.  :o

 

Eagles are beautiful animals. The drones I work with don't have to worry much about eagles, though. Some fly at Mach 2 over 30,000 feet, others have to stay up in the air for 10 days. I haven't seen eagles doing that :-)

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There's one of those in my local museum along with a Boys Rifle.

Here's an odd little anecdote for you.....I was out walking my Lurchers a few nights back and bumped into a lad with a strong Welsh accent walking his Jack-Russell Terrier.  Got chatting and it tuned out he was into wargaming too, particularly painting military figures (which I hate).  Got chatting some more and it turned out that my Great-Grandfather (2nd Battalion, the Worcestershire Regiment) had charged to the relief of his Great-Grandfather (1st Battalion, the South Wales Borderers) at the Battle of Gheluvelt: 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Battle_of_Ypres#Battle_of_Gheluvelt

http://www.worcestershireregiment.com/wr.php?main=inc/h_gheluvelt

http://www.inthefootsteps.com/First-World-War/Ypres/Gheluvelt-SWB-and-2nd-Worcesters-Memorials.html

Coincidence?  Maybe, but this conversation took place at Worcester's Gheluvelt Park:   

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gheluvelt_Park,_Worcester

I think I'd call that synchronicity TBH.  ;)

Edited by Sgt.Squarehead

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Sgt.Squarehead,

Quite the anecdote, and thanks much for sharing it with me. Believe I can do something with that on one of my writing projects. Concerning synchronicity, I read long ago that the more synchronicity in your life, the more the flow. Would say you're already up to river category with yours! Two other responses:

Am also wondering how you ever managed to get this guy on a leash, and where did you find a second?
 

Sorry. My mistake!   You were referring to highly specialized, ferocious and brave beasts intended, perhaps, to run him down and corner him?

Regards,

John Kettler

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Andy,

Thanks much for the explanation of a matter obviously utterly opaque to me (regardless of the humor opportunities it afforded).

Today's offering is something I came across on Yahoo, in which I found a little info bomb. Bold mine.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/most-people-dont-use-tinder-for-love-or-sex-heres-why-they-really-use-it-2017-03-23?mod=MW_story_top_stories

All of this voyeurism can be expensive, if you don’t follow through. The matchmaking industry is now worth about $2.4 billion, and rises around 5% per year, with revenue split between advertising and subscription services, according to a report by research firm IBISWorld. Of that, around $1.1 billion is from online dating, $576 million is from mobile apps such as Tinder, and the rest is made up mainly of matchmakers and singles events. A decade ago, many sites were free or had minimal fees of around $20 a month. (Match.com charged $9.95 per month when it launched in 1995.) 

There’s another downside to all that choice. Americans are increasingly picky when it comes to dating, particularly those who have Apple AAPL, -0.91% iPhones, according to a separate survey of 5,500 singletons aged 18 and over by Match.com, which was released last month. iPhone owners are 21 times more likely to judge others negatively for having an Android, while those who have an Android are 15 times more likely to judge others negatively for having an iPhone. And those who have older models of either smartphone are 56% less likely to get a date.

Remember, you read it here first.

Regards,

John Kettler

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Tonight's offerings!

Russian Criminal Tattoos Tumblr (Trued to break the link, but failed; the words listed will get you there; some NSFW)

Looks as though there are lots of new pattern Russian criminal tattoos. They don't follow the style of the kinds I've seen in law enforcement guides and such.

From Tumble called daily-meme comes a fabulous LOTR birthday cake. We wants it; we does!

daily-meme: “Perfect LOTR Cake. ”

Regards,

John Kettler

Edited by John Kettler

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The bad news—for me at any rate—is that the maple syrup I find in the stores these days doesn't have much flavor any more. This in spite of the fact that the label says "100% Pure Maple Syrup" and "Product of Canada". So maybe my taste buds are finally giving out, I don't know. I just wish my syrup had the same flavor kick that it used to have.

MIchael

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15 hours ago, John Kettler said:

I recall being practically stupefied when I read the explanation of how it worked. The notion that someone could come up with such a thing, still less figure out how to build it, was incredible, though I did see the rather obvious issues attending a terrestrial launch!

The terrestrial launch issues are a red-herring, the 10m & 20m Orion prototypes were designed to piggy-back a Saturn Ic to altitude before triggering the Orion propulsion.

Optionally the same booster could lift several different Orion configurations to orbit in parts (two parts for the 10m & 20m as I recall) for final assembly.

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Andy,

Glad someone thought that out. Please let us know when the one you're building is ready. Maybe Putin can spare a mighty Energiya derived system to get it to ignition altitude.?More importantly, does this break the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and who should be charged with the violation? While we're talking nuclear-propelled rocketry, may I suggest you look up the truly remarkable story of David Adair, a former young engineering prodigy whose calculations reached some nobody named Hawking and impressed him. Mr. Adair is now an expert in space spinoff technologies and someone who was/is involved with things like in-orbit metallurgy to create what's impossible here in Earth's strong gravity. Got to hear a lecture by him a long time ago, during which he talked about a material like something straight out of OST or later: transparent titanium!

The story he told us about his foray into nuclear rocketry was the result of getting involved in some NSF sponsored amateur competition. The plan was for the teenaged kids to come to Wright Patterson AFB with their birds and fire them there. That plan never anticipated someone showing up at the gate in a big truck (driven by his dad) towing a lowboy trailer with something "the size of a Polaris missile" on it. General Curt LeMay, retired, I believe, but still quite powerful, architect of the mighty SAC (Strategic Air Command), was overseeing the project and happened to look out the window. What he saw so shocked him his aide said he nearly dropped his ever present (unlit) cigar from his mouth. The more agitated he was, the more the cigar would wigwag. That this incident nearly generated a cigar launch pretty much says it all on how he reacted. Clearly, this monster (powered by a revolutionary electromagnetic containment plasma fusion rocket engine) wasn't safe to launch at the base, so he whistled up a big bird and off they went to WSMR (White Sands Missile Range for those not familiar). According to Mr. Adair, the plan was to fire it downrange there, but an individual under a cover name and disguised, whom he recognized as a Project Paperclip scientist, insisted on changing the impact zone. It was to that place the government didn't acknowledge the existence of until the Bill Clinton presidency. There followed a remarkable field trip ultimately resulting in being part of closed door testimony before selected members of Congress. David Adair authored a book (I've not read) called America's Fall from Space," and there is a documentary of the same name now in post-production. You may find the two articles here of interest. There are other article there, too. As astounding as the things he told us circa 1992 were, I found him eminently credible, and after the lecture, I had the chance to meet him, shake his hand and ask some tough followup questions while looking him straight in the eye and watching him for tells there, in his face and body language. He passed. Really nice guy, too.

Regards,

John Kettler

 

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1 hour ago, John Kettler said:

Andy,

Glad someone thought that out. Please let us know when the one you're building is ready. Maybe Putin can spare a mighty Energiya derived system to get it to ignition altitude.?More importantly, does this break the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, and who should be charged with the violation? While we're talking nuclear-propelled rocketry, may I suggest you look up the truly remarkable story of David Adair, a former young engineering prodigy whose calculations reached some nobody named Hawking and impressed him. Mr. Adair is now an expert in space spinoff technologies and someone who was/is involved with things like in-orbit metallurgy to create what's impossible here in Earth's strong gravity. Got to hear a lecture by him a long time ago, during which he talked about a material like something straight out of OST or later: transparent titanium!

The story he told us about his foray into nuclear rocketry was the result of getting involved in some NSF sponsored amateur competition. The plan was for the teenaged kids to come to Wright Patterson AFB with their birds and fire them there. That plan never anticipated someone showing up at the gate in a big truck (driven by his dad) towing a lowboy trailer with something "the size of a Polaris missile" on it. General Curt LeMay, retired, I believe, but still quite powerful, architect of the mighty SAC (Strategic Air Command), was overseeing the project and happened to look out the window. What he saw so shocked him his aide said he nearly dropped his ever present (unlit) cigar from his mouth. The more agitated he was, the more the cigar would wigwag. That this incident nearly generated a cigar launch pretty much says it all on how he reacted. Clearly, this monster (powered by a revolutionary electromagnetic containment plasma fusion rocket engine) wasn't safe to launch at the base, so he whistled up a big bird and off they went to WSMR (White Sands Missile Range for those not familiar). According to Mr. Adair, the plan was to fire it downrange there, but an individual under a cover name and disguised, whom he recognized as a Project Paperclip scientist, insisted on changing the impact zone. It was to that place the government didn't acknowledge the existence of until the Bill Clinton presidency. There followed a remarkable field trip ultimately resulting in being part of closed door testimony before selected members of Congress. David Adair authored a book (I've not read) called America's Fall from Space," and there is a documentary of the same name now in post-production. You may find the two articles here of interest. There are other article there, too. As astounding as the things he told us circa 1992 were, I found him eminently credible, and after the lecture, I had the chance to meet him, shake his hand and ask some tough followup questions while looking him straight in the eye and watching him for tells there, in his face and body language. He passed. Really nice guy, too.

Regards,

John Kettler

 

http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread277058/pg2#pid3106244

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David Adair is by no means the first person to create something amazing after dreaming about it, sometimes in full form. Lightweights like Einstein and Bohr are in this set of somewhat overlapping lists.

10 Dreams That Changed Human History

http://www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/10-dreams-that-changed-the-course-of-human-history.html

5 Famous Things You Won't Believe Were Invented in Dreams

http://www.cracked.com/article_20498_5-famous-things-you-wont-believe-were-invented-in-dreams.html

11 Creative Breakthroughs People Had in Their Sleep

http://mentalfloss.com/article/12763/11-creative-breakthroughs-people-had-their-sleep

As for neural interfaces as control means, I should tell you the technology has been seen a bunch of times. Further, that colleague of mine at Hughes Missile Systems Group who had a sponsor in the CIA's's Office of Scientific and Weapons Research (no bull: went to Langley, was ushered into to the man's office and met him myself, then was thrown out for the latest intel download to my co-worker) told me of work underway on a brain controlled super duper sniper rifle. This was 1980 or so. Believe he told me he got to play with the targeting portion, which was driven via electrodes on a kind of scalp cap. 

Regards,

John Kettler

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Here is another fine example of unintended effects from a law that seemed a good idea when first conceived and implemented. This raised my hackles. Before this I used to think some of the nonsense of Homeowner's Associations and Neighborhood Covenants was bad, but this takes the cake.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2017/04/07/the_aclu_sues_maplewood_missouri_over_its_nuisance_law.html

Regards,

John Kettler

Edited by John Kettler

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BletchleyGeek,

Was so busy trying to get the post right I don't notice my own inadvertent pun. How much helium did I have to use to achieve the effect you reported?

Michael Emrys,

Have you tried any of the maple syrup/s at Trader Joe's?

Regards,

John Kettler

Edited by John Kettler

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