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German armor naming convention


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well,

in the early days there simply was no need to use 'suggestive' names like 'Tiger' or 'Panther'.

After WW2 turned, Hitler was the one that ordered to use suggestive names. Guess he thought it would inspire his own troops and would create fear within the opponent...

Fred

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A lot easier to keep up on also. Yeah, Lion would have been a good one. Guess Germany was able to use Leopard finally , course old mustache face wasn't around then. That really was a awesome looking tank - the Leopard. I think it was the best looking tank ever made. Sorry I can't show you a picture but some of us aren't as computer wise as others. I'm in the first bunch. :D

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I can't do pics yet, but i can shamelessly post links to other websites ...

http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/land/row/leopard2.htm

:D

Of note are the two distinctly different turrets (is one the swedish indigenouse turret?), and the generally vertical armour ... have the Germans forgotten about sloped armour :confused:

Other new kitties from the Germans are the Jaguar, Luchs, and Wolf (ok, not really part of the cat family).

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Not really an answer to your question, but just a slight correction in terms of the naming of vehicles. The Germans did not refer to any of their vehicles as "Mark IV" or "Mark V," or any direct translation as such. "Mark" is a term used by the Brits to refer to the different panzers, as well as other things, too. IIRC, the Germans used the Sdkfz. numerical designations as the formal vehicle identifications (for maintenance/parts reasons), but in actual practice the vehicles were referred to as Panzer I thru IV. Also, although the Brits would often refer to the Panther as the Mark V, or the Tiger as Mark VI, the Germans didn't usually refer to these vehicles as Panzer V or Panzer VI, instead they used the cat names.

I know, I didn't answer your question, because I don't have a clue as to why the Germans started using the cat names.

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They also had the Rhino (Nashorn),the Wasp (Wespe), the Bumblebee(Hummel) and the Flamingo (PZII Flame version )and, of course, the Elephant ( That's 'Elefant', for the hard of understanding). If memory serves, they also had the Brummbaur (Grizzly Bear) and the Maultier( Mule, a halftrack, but carrying Neberwerfer). I have a sneaking suspicion that "Hetzer" means something also, but can't think what. So thats cats, insects, birds and pachyderms, and whatever rhinos are.

Of course the real question is why, when I was cramming all this useless information into my head, wasn't I learning something useful like bricklaying, light engineering or a good programming language instead?

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by catullus:

[QB]The Pz.Kpfw. II Ausf. L was a cat, the Luchs we all love. Another version of the PanzerII was named Leopard, but never put in production. see http://www.achtungpanzer.com/leo.htm

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Mmmm, didn't Dr.Porsche name one of his tanks, which was meant to be the successor to the Mk.IV, the "Leopard"? The Panther basically replaced it, as it and the competing Rhienmetall design were underarmoured and undergunned compared to the T-34.

Vk.4000 series I believe, if memory serves me correctly - my books are presently packed away after a house move and I haven't got them on the shelves yet.

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by boy_Recon:

They also had the...Maultier( Mule, a halftrack, but carrying Neberwerfer).<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If memory serves, the Maultier began life as an armored ammo carrier, hence the name. Later, they were looking for an enclosed armored vehicle to mount the Nebelwerfer on and, hey presto!

Michael

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