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WW2 UAV's


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In the Normandy campaign, Piper Cubs and Taylorcraft Austers were used to look for ambushes in the hedgerows and spot for artillery.  Is there any reason why they can’t be put into WW2 titles as “manned” UAV’s (aside from having scenario designers over-use them)?  The game mechanism could be exactly like a UAV, including the possibility of getting shot down.  They would have to be controlled by a FAC, otherwise the guys on the ground would have no idea what’s being spotted.  Enemies spotted could get artillery called on them by the FAC, or that knowledge would slowly filter through the chain of command.  Other CM titles (obviously not Normandy) could allow Germans to use the Fieseler Storch the same way.

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My guess is that Piper cubs generally spotted for artillery well behind the front line and is therefore not really in the scope of a typical CM game. Also, the cubs only had communication with select arty units and generally wouldn't be much help in spotting ambushes in hedgerows because they didn't have comms with those front line ground units. It's certainly is an interesting possibility since it's done for Black Sea, but my guess is that it's such a rare occurrence that it's not worth spending the time coding.

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The Piper Cub wikipedia page (citing a 1945 magazine) mentions spotting ambushes. The Army Green Books have a few Piper Cub mentions. In the breakout phase, US armored columns would have eyes in the sky (the passage is not clear if they were fighter-bombers spotting or Cubs spotting for FB's). They were commonly used for artillery observation and intelligence, and while counter-battery work is outside the scope, some of it is within. As far as rarity, I think they were more commonly used in CM-type battles than King Tigers.

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The Piper Cub wikipedia page (citing a 1945 magazine) mentions spotting ambushes. The Army Green Books have a few Piper Cub mentions. In the breakout phase, US armored columns would have eyes in the sky (the passage is not clear if they were fighter-bombers spotting or Cubs spotting for FB's). They were commonly used for artillery observation and intelligence, and while counter-battery work is outside the scope, some of it is within. As far as rarity, I think they were more commonly used in CM-type battles than King Tigers.

 

I read about the 'eyes in the sky' at Operation Cobra some years back and if I am correct these used to be CAS fighter bombers C2 linked to certain tank crews (company commanders and above I guess).

Just my 2 Cents...

 

 

Cheers

Olf

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I read about the 'eyes in the sky' at Operation Cobra some years back and if I am correct these used to be CAS fighter bombers C2 linked to certain tank crews (company commanders and above I guess).

 

 

During the breakout and pursuit there were FACs who were actual aviators that were given their own AFV and crew to accompany the spearheads. IIRC they were attached at battalion level, but you might want to check on that. There weren't too many of them, so they should have pretty high rarity. That was the situation in the US army; I don't know precisely how the Brits worked it out, but they did have some means of calling on cab rank CAS.

 

Michael

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