Jump to content
John Kettler

John Kettler's Omnibus Post

Recommended Posts

Sgt.Squarehead,

After rewatching the video, I picked up on something I hadn't noticed that first time and was, I believe, remarked upon in a separate armor video related to the main one. That was that the way the deflector rib was attached to the armor (three rivets, one at front and the others on the far end of each leg) made it give when hit, thus dissipating some of the arrow's energy, and even bending if hit hard enough, much like a crumple zone on a car. In the former case, it would give, deflect and spring back. In the latter case, the "V" was a form of sacrificial armor, winding up bent, maybe in the limit destroyed. But upon further study of the T-64's "V", I noticed it wasn't welded down throughout but was, in fact, welded in only a few places, thus, I would think, at least potentially getting the same net effect as on the Agincourt breastplate.

MIchael Emrys,

Was previously unaware of these shot deflectors. As for utility, uneven impact loads degrade penetration (via tip erosion, projectile directional change, etc.), or even defeat penetration by, amor-piercing projectiles.

Erwin,

That could be true. Were that the case, though, I'd expect no gap beneath most of that deflector.

Regards,
 

John Kettler

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Picked up a Soviet and now Russia pertinent aircraft designator tidbit while reading the translation of the official history of the Red Air Force in the GPW. Shortly before the GPW broke out a new system was introduced for new generation aircraft. Fighters were assigned odd numbers and bombers even. Thus, MiG-3, Yak-1, La-7, etc., but Pe-2, Il-2, Tu-4. If you think about it, this held during the Cold War and is true today: MiG-15,17,19,21,23,31; Su-7,17, 25, 35 as fighter type aircraft, but Su-24,Tu-16,22,22M,160, Mya-4, Su-34 bombers. Groggery is where you find it!

Regards,

John Kettler

Edited by John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found this informative and well-illustrated article(also has embedded vid) on female samurai (whom I'd not heard of before tonight) posted on FB. The Comments offer rich pickings on the OT and other matters, too. 
https://nextshark.com/samurai-women-history-forgot/?fbclid=IwAR382BpSj07_1dz-EG6wG1HvOFQW0ice5n-OlqWo6A2Gbmv7onS8i0H-KAA

Regards,

John Kettler

Edited by John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For someone who used to religiously watch "The Lone Ranger" as a little boy, this is a wonderful and surprising read. Bass Reeves made his fictional and wrong race counterpart look like a wimp by comparison. His collar count is astounding and his feats amazing.

https://allthatsinteresting.com/bass-reeves?fbclid=IwAR3UlD_NruWC2nuElHvgVpwoKyTHPWZhNb1muuoKStVkBj52faRFglZPXgY

Regards,

John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great article on military working dogs has a real curve ball in it. The dogs carry rank and are always one rank higher than the handler. To me, this is weird, since the handler has to be the alpha as head of the pack, for that is the normal way dogs operate with owners or handlers. Else the dog runs the latter, to all effects. When it's not that way; when the dog wasn't properly trained as to who was on top, you get situations in which the owner can be ignored by the dog, but where someone is willing to assert authority, the dog responds to commands otherwise ignored. For extra fun, try dealing with a 70 pound pit bull like this that has de facto PTSD from saving the owner from two other pit bulls, in a fearsome fight which nearly killed the heroic dog. As the mail marking goes "Special Handling Required." Have direct experience as the one the dog does listen to.

https://www.businessinsider.com/why-dogs-in-the-military-always-outrank-their-handlers-2019-10?utm_content=bufferf3a6c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer-politics&fbclid=IwAR2iUfLC0YWX6u9hw7wVyOXXiBvdfUIy7XF6_yyZJe7AD1ASro9UZPH9oE4

Regards,

John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Visions of War (Free on Prime or by free trial) has an episode on Tiger 131. In it, I learned why the crew bailed out after having the turret jammed. There was more two it than that, for that strike apparently also wounded the driver and the bow MG gunner/radio man as well, rendering the tank completely undriveable. Judging from a brief pic of a crude grave marker, both died. Things I'd read said a 6 pounder did the deed, but the Bovington guy said it was a75 mm AP (presumably US AP turned into shot) from a Churchill troop in which the Tiger had already brewed up one and wounded the crew in the other. Doc has a few glitches here and there, but has some great pics and footage, including 131 post capture, an official British Tiger recognition film, interview with Panzerwaffe expert Bob Carruthers, who did an unseen by me translation and annotation of of the Tigerfibel, the extended video of the Jagdtiger Kompanie (looks a bit bizarre, too, perhaps because of lens used). There's even a modeling segment.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/video/detail/B01DEFZL2O/ref=pd_cbs_318_5

Regards,

John Kettler 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished the 2018 "T-34" film, which overall I thoroughly enjoyed. Thought it was vastly superior to "Fury" and was hugely relieved it was mostly movie and not head-breaking for me digital FX blazing into my brain. Looks to me as if a big chunk of change went into sets, soft-skins, AFVs (lots of OT-810s as 251s, I believe, and maybe a real Panther or two); PaK 40 was real. Production values were tremendous, strong story, well acted and great camera work. Director clearly knew his stuff.  His film got great reviews on Amazon and truly deserved them. "White Tiger" is a farce by comparison.

Crazy as the fight in that Russian village looked, I've seen dug in T-34s less than 10 meters from the road they were ambushing in the same sort of village. A Sherman rammed a King Tiger in Normandy, and there are a number of cases where Russian tankers rammed German ones. Panther traverse was pretty ponderous (to some degree true, especially with engine at idle), but Panzer III should've been faster. Love the demonstration of the impact even one well-fought tank can have on the enemy, especially starting with ambush fire. Last fight was stupid, but the visuals were great. From what I can tell, the Germans were done right, and it was delightful to hear Germans speak German (not British speaking English with a German accent) and Russians speak Russian. Was thrilled to see a T-34/76, too. The interior of a 76 mm Sherman is cavernous compared to a T-34/76. Has English subtitles for dialogue but unfortunately not for credits, so missed out on lots of things, but did learn it was filmed in Czechoslovakia, which I suspect should actually be the Czech Republic.
 

Regards,

John Kettler

Edited by John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael Emrys,

Yes. Cost me a whole $3.99.

On a separate note, this is a fantastic example of the Russian approach to dealing with "impassable terrain for armor". During the Cold War, US and NATO troops learned to mine ALL the approaches, not just the obvious roads. In AUGUST STORM, the Russians put T-34s over the Great Kinghan Mountains, slopes so severe Shermans had to be towed by T-34s, and in OPERATION BAGRATION, the Germans learned it WAS possible to move armor into and attack from the gigantic "impassable" Pripyat Marshes. This, though, is in a league unto itself. Here's how to get tanks across a ford with a near vertical cliff in the way.  Gasped aloud!
 

Regards,

John Kettler 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The P-39 Airacobra was so terrible a plane that the British flew one combat mission in the type and withdrew it from service! Yet the same plane was the glory of the Soviet Air Force. Here is the fascinating story of this remarkable aircraft.

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/americas-worst-world-war-ii-fighter-was-the-star-the-russian-22152

Regards,

John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Red Army GPW weapons and transport are your thing, have I got a treat for you, but only if you use FB or can see it through someone else. There's a Russian named Yuri Pasholok who is such a treadhead his profile pic has him in the classic tankist helmet! One of his posts alone was 48 pics in page size format of GPW gloriousness being prepped practically next to the Kremlin.His photo albums contains quite a number of folders and has videos, too. Wish I had a website URL for him, but I didn't see one listed.

https://www.facebook.com/yuripasholok/media_set?set=a.2430208427197237&type=3

Regards,

John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have exciting news!

MIchael Emrys is not an avatar, AI construct, a myth or anything other than a genial. kind and wise man. This isn't speculation but the result of a direct meeting with him at an undisclosed PNW location recently while accompanied by a professional meticulous observer (brother George, who served 20 years as a Scout for the US Army). The Michael Emrys of the CM Forums is the same one we met and spoke with, but F2F provided far more nuanced and less constrained communication. The Grand Old Man of Combat Mission (a role he takes both seriously and wryly) is a keen observer of Forum doings and a hardcore CMBS player, having replayed one scenario 20 times before cracking the code on how to win. Wish we'd been able to spend more time with him, but we had had to get back in fairly short order. If you ever get a chance to see him, jump on it. He'll greet you with a warm smile and an impressively strong handshake.

Regards,

John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, John Kettler said:

Have exciting news!

MIchael Emrys is not an avatar, AI construct, a myth or anything other than a genial. kind and wise man. This isn't speculation but the result of a direct meeting with him at an undisclosed PNW location recently while accompanied by a professional meticulous observer (brother George, who served 20 years as a Scout for the US Army). The Michael Emrys of the CM Forums is the same one we met and spoke with, but F2F provided far more nuanced and less constrained communication. The Grand Old Man of Combat Mission (a role he takes both seriously and wryly) is a keen observer of Forum doings and a hardcore CMBS player, having replayed one scenario 20 times before cracking the code on how to win. Wish we'd been able to spend more time with him, but we had had to get back in fairly short order. If you ever get a chance to see him, jump on it. He'll greet you with a warm smile and an impressively strong handshake.

Regards,

John Kettler

+1. Very nice story.  @Michael Emrys and @John Kettler two of the most polite, helpful and articulate forum members.   

 🍻 <- beer mugs :D

Edited by MOS:96B2P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, John Kettler said:

...a hardcore CMBS player, having replayed one scenario 20 times before cracking the code on how to win.

You do me an injustice. It was only half a dozen instances of having my ass handed to me before I worked out a routine that allowed me to obtain Total Victory every time, usually with only one or two casualties, or even none at all. It is those that number somewhere around 20 or more. I find it interesting that each play through was a little different from all the others, the mark of a truly well-designed game system.

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, MOS:96B2P said:

+1. Very nice story.  @Michael Emrys and @John Kettler two of the most polite, helpful and articulate forum members.   

 🍻 <- beer mugs :D

And may I say that I have long since recognized you sir as one of the true gentlemen of the forum. (And the next round is on me. :))

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael Emrys,

As my brother George will aver, my info retention was poor at best on this trip, but at least I got the gist of what you had told us down, despite errors with the game play count. Regret we had neither time for tea or beer, but at least we were finally able to meet! Have you tried out what I brought? Also, please, what was the name of that game system you thought I'd enjoy?

MOS:96B2P,

Thanks for the kind words regarding us.

Regards,

John Kettler

Edited by John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, John Kettler said:

Also, please, what was the name of that game system you thought I'd enjoy?

Unity of Command. They have just recently released a completely new addition, this time on the Western Front, but the one I would recommend starting with is the first one, which is set on the Eastern Front. In any event, there isn't a Mac version of the second game out yet and might be a couple of months or more before one is available.

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...