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One of the important things the West learned about the Soviets was that they would use ANY unprotected avenue of approach to penetrate NATO defenses. Now, most thought in terms of trails and such, but

What with all the carping and kvetching of late, I thought I'd start an omnibus post thread for various items of interest, but which aren't necessarily directly connected to CM. For my first effo

Oohh damnit you got here first Erwin. Tell me John - are you REALLLY REALLY checking for any shady Kampfwagons that may be converted Ice Cream nuke VBIEDs? Jingle jangle.

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MOS:96B2P,

If you watch the full film sequence (helpfully provided by a CoC colleague), the likelihood is that the tank is fully crewed. Seriously doubt the driver alone would be allowed to do these things solo, but I wouldn't be shocked to learn the entire crew was officers. An old Soviet peep show trick to deliver guaranteed high standards of performance (especially after vast rehearsal) later seen in the Coronation Review and in Operation Dnepr. Can you imagine the US ever blowing up a bridge right in the face of our own tank like that? That was real HE, not that Hollywood nonsense.
 

Erwin,

Combat Regulations for the Armored Troops specifically mandated that hatches be closed and locked once the tank was committed to battle, which is what this is supposed to mimic. Accounts I've read indicated that the rule was sometimes not adhered to, but the veterans always said they could've gotten severely punished for doing so. Examples include opening a T-34's hatch at Kursk after the driver passed out from heat and heavy cordite fumes and in an account of street fighting in which the writer indicated the hatches were down but not locked to give the crew a chance of surviving otherwise lethal overpressure if hit by a Panzerfaust or similar. A hit tank with everything buttoned was a sure fire dead crew against such weapons.

Regards,

John Kettler

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Watched this generally well done docudrama last night. Had a bunch of footage I'd not seen before and recast others to depict what was being discussed. It's the story of the renowned and highly decorated Normandie Niemen Regiment, France's contribution to the Soviet war effort and proof the French could and would fight. Free with Prime.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/video/detail/B01J4SNC76/ref=atv_hm_hom_3_c_D4dtpS_2_14?fbclid=IwAR2eTjMaDdcLpXFINn1vyFDQLjIrJ6u4hYtvjN2AtJXEIcxeW6c0n7lZlR0#customer-review-section

Regards,

John Kettler

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This is great article on a bunch of levels, and a good chunk of it is directly CMFB pertinent, too. This is the true story of an extraordinary man and true warrior, whose most magnificent show of courage wasn't recognized until long after he died--all because he was black when he did it and racism was rampant.

https://allthatsinteresting.com/edward-a-carter-jr?fbclid=IwAR2IYyDd_5WmNMQPvrv4BJmSWK8fhOY8kxWPhue55fMegbmSEnh-50wheUc
 

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John Kettler

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On 1/2/2020 at 5:12 PM, John Kettler said:

One of the important things the West learned about the Soviets was that they would use ANY unprotected avenue of approach to penetrate NATO defenses. Now, most thought in terms of trails and such, but here's an example which illustrates precisely how clever they could be. BT-7 command tank crosses a destroyed (or maybe unfinished) bridge.

tumblr_nvifiwDM5G1qc0pn9o1_400.gif

Regards,

John Kettler

Tanks can do that IRL but in CM they get immobilized on rocky ground in very dry conditions.

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A CoC colleague posted this great Military History piece. The presenter is way better with his delivery than just about anyone I've seen, too. Have this nagging memory of crossing paths last year with some book where Churchill tasked a British officer to secretly obtain and bring back a Tiger tank, but can't for the life of me recall the title. Anyone know this book?
 

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John Kettler

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The book is called Catch a Tiger and is hotly disputed by the Tank Museum, not least because the man who supposedly captured it in a hail of bullets, Major Lidderdale, says he wasn't there then. Here is the besta available information on the circumstances and cause of the loss of Tiger 131. Six parts of a page or so and lots of pics! Had no idea it was hit four times.

https://blog.tiger-tank.com/tanks/tiger-131-new-story/

Regards,

John Kettler

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This is simply wonderful news! The black steward who got his mortally wounded skipper out of harm's way manned the antiaircraft machine gun (for which he wasn't trained) and fought until he was out of ammo at Pearl Harbor is now going to have the next Ford-class carrier named for him. 

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2020/01/19/navy-once-called-him-unknown-negro-sailor-now-its-naming-carrier-after-him.html?fbclid=IwAR3UgaobCV86f6JqQTbvofOmO-9UXsPkKFG3Q9KB4um5dTZ7mPSJ3UyZ0_w

Absolutely love this! Now, if we could rename all the carriers named for people who weren't great naval heroes, that would be grand, too.

Regards,

John Kettler

 

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Believe I may've found the origins of calling Sherman tanks Ronsons. In The Brassey's Book of Military Blunders, it says the troops started calling the Sherman that during the Battle Kasserine, Pass to which I opine this likely was the result of encounters with the dreaded Mark IV Special, since it was eminently capable of smashing through the front armor of the otherwise well protected vs Panzer fire Sherman.

Regards,

John Kettler

 

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Many of you have seen @BudBacker's wonderful comic AARs and thought he and you might appreciate seeing something similar done by one of my CoC colleagues, who has been sent the link to Bud's AARs. Just click the pic to go to the flip presentation on FB.
 

Regards,

John Kettler
 

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If you've ever read about small craft warfare in the MTO, you've almost certainly encountered mention/s of a nasty weapon called the F-lighter, which drew so little water it couldn't be torpedoed, forcing a shift to guns for PTs and MTBs. The only image I've ever seen was garbage, but take a look at this one. Further, it appears there was one involved at Nijmegen during MARKET GARDEN.

image-asset.jpeg?format=2500w
 

Regards,

John Kettler

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Correction. Brother George, who's quite knowledgeable about coastal warfare in WW II, has pointedly informed me the heavily armed behemoth is a Siebel Ferry, NOT an F-lighter.

Mods! Warlord link is solely to a WW II pic of an F Lighter.

F-Lighter.png?fbclid=IwAR0Tpu5vLkEPId8kL

Heres a link to a F-Lighter model review which is so info rich on the history and capabilities of the F-Lighter that it has links to military history works.

http://www.steelnavy.com/WEMFlakLighter.htm?fbclid=IwAR3f6ilawA1atJ4kxmSLi0fhTzTtUUetMryjIXo1r9-dptyUKDdOfh4vCx4

Regards,

John Kettler

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