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Technology in WW2


dieseltaylor

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Following on from the query on engine technologies I was reading an excellent book on air combat and it mentioned the gyroscopic sights which basically made average pilots as lethal as good pilots.

So trying to restrict it to WW2 action/possible use

Brits

Radar

Gyroscopic sights

Asdic/Sonar [astonishingly early]

Hedgehog

Jet engine

AWACs

Window chaff

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaff_%28countermeasure%29

HFDF

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipsqueak#Pipsqueak

Germans

Rockets

Jet engines

good Bazookas

Chaff

US

Bazooka

site of the work on the atom bomb

Italians

midget subs?

I am sure the US did invent new war technologies - what were they

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There's radio control of missiles by both the Germans and US - German glider bombs, Fritz-X & AA missile (Wasserfall?), and US Azon

USA & UK - digital computers (Colossus & ENIAC respectively) Germany was also devbeloping them - see Konrad Zuse....but wasn't using them AFAIK.

UK:

4, 6 and 10 ton bombs

HESH

Germany:

Swept wing

Air-independant propulsion for subs

Helicopter

Acoustic torpedo

Wire guided AT missile

IR sights

AA mssile

"Assault rifle" concept

Invented here & Developed there:

Bazooka - US & Germany

VT Fuses - UK & USA

Radar: UK & everyone

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Following on from the query on engine technologies I was reading an excellent book on air combat and it mentioned the gyroscopic sights which basically made average pilots as lethal as good pilots.

Some would hold the view that there were only a few good fighter pilots. The rest just made up the numbers and provided the kill scores for the good pilots.

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You should have read the whole article, and not just the bit about the glider tank.

The Tetrach wasn't actually designed to be an airborne tank - it was just something that was light enough to fit into a Hamilcar glider!

By that definition the M1 is an airborne tank now there are aircraft capable of transporting it!

The US M22 Locust was actually designed to be an airborne tank

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Just like you apparently don't bother reading all of wiki once you've identified the first picture ;)

.

The bit where they strap "tankettes" under the bombers? ie. not tanks. Just the crappy Soviet equivalent of a Bren carrier.

Or you mean the bit where they have to ditch the actual tank because of the drag? Tank lands safely of course. Yes, I read that. The tank that even to get it up in the air they have to strip it of "armament, ammunition, headlights and leaving a very limited amount of fuel". So they are gliding in a mobile metal box. Once.

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Here's another one I'm sure you'll love - Christie from 1932.....

If you can find a copy of Lt Col Glantz's 1984 study "The Soviet Airborne Experience" online, he has TOE's for Airborne Brigades that include 11 T-38's or T-40's as part of the air landable component in 1940 (Table 4, page 21) - the Brigade had 3 groups - a parachute group & a glider group that weer identical, and an "Air landing" Group that included the light tanks.

Sadly there is no mention of just where the gliders or transports for them were to come from! :)

the Airborne Corps of 1941 had 50 light tanks (Table 5) - later reduced to 32 - presumably due to a dearth of transports!

Actually that's a little unfair - the lack of transports is acknowledged, and efforts were apparently underway to get them...but this was in early June 1941, and things were about to get out of hand with the development of transport aircraft losing some its priority!

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Well I am a little bit biased, because I had a relative in the 1st Airborne (Arty). But I think about one of the worst jobs in the world must have been crash landing a Hamilcar glider into a field with 7 tonnes of tank strapped below and behind you. Ditto a Horsa with a jeep or howitzer behind your head and only plywood as protection.

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And we shouldn't forget German innovations like anti-matter generators, flying discs with Panther turrets etc.

Serious Brit contributions would also have been some of the specialised ordnance like the earthquake bomb concept for penetrating hardened structures. Also Penicillin. At least that one was about saving lives!

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