Jump to content

Ambushes, MGs, & Bunkers


Recommended Posts

I guess "close range" isn't what I mean so much as lethal range. In my various reading of combat accounts, from WWII & in Vietnam, bunker complexes were often discovered only after they opened up on US troops at a killing range, killing some outright and pinning the remainder under murderous fire. Defenders gained a dual advantage: 1) of being in prepared fortified defensive positions: and 2), being able to iniate combat,i.e., take offensive action via ambush.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My feeling is that AT teams were dispatched independently much more often than MG teams, which were normally kept with the platoon. Not sure if this is infact the case doctrine wise, but that is my impression. MG teams can target ambush markers as long as they are in command, so this shouldn't hinder you too much.

--Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Michael emrys

How about giving them a Hide order, Armdchair? Have you tried that?

Michael

[This message has been edited by Michael emrys (edited 09-27-2000).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I tried the " Hide" order and that didn't work out too well. It really doesn't operate the same as "Ambush". Using the "Hide" order you run the risk that Crepitis pointed out: of letting the enemy get dangerously close to your positions. I'm also not too sure of Wehrmacht doctrine but my impression was that they tended to use more independent MG teams & MG nests than Allied forces did because they were usually on the defensive, and to compensate for the lack of manpower with firepower. This would also have applied to understrength Allied forces on the defensive in say, the Bulge for instance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...