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New MAC software, good for CM???


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Question about this new MAC software that allows Win XP to be run on a MAC

Does this feature now make it easier to run CMBO, CMAK etc on a MAC ??

I would love a MAC, but not being able to play CM without a load of hassles is stopping me - maybe the solution is hire now ??

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The Boot Camp appl makes Intel based Macs into a dual boot system with 2 partitions on the HD, MacOS X(HFS extended) and WinXP(NTFS) not FAT32. Currently there is little compatibility. MacOS X ability to use NTFS is limited and XP can’t mount HFS ext, or so I am told. There may be appls, like DAVE that will permit mounting both partitions simultaneously; the good news about this that XP malware can’t screw up your Mac partition. The bad news is you cannot share files like MS Word files without some effort, like having it on a USB memory stick formatted in FAT.

Now, to answer your question, any XP compatible program should work because it is running as an XP computer. Boot Camp is supplying the drivers, if what I read is correct. I don’t have an Intel-based Mac, so I cannot test it. Maybe someone can take their PC copy to a store that sells Macs and try it, or even better BTS might try it and see if it works.

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Originally posted by MouseBert:

the good news about this that XP malware can’t screw up your Mac partition. The bad news is you cannot share files like MS Word files without some effort, like having it on a USB memory stick formatted in FAT.

The pessismist in me just realized that the partition table should be accessible from the disk manager in Windows. You can't access data on the HFS+ partition, but you can screw up all partitions on the disk :(

A possible solution to data transfer problesm could maybe be to have a third partition formatted in FAT32, which is writable from both Windows and OS X.

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The big question here is whether the virtual machine passes through 3D hardware acceleration. And if it does, whether is passes through DirectX 5.x, which is required for CM.

The Wine emulator does. VMware has some limited beta support for it. I have no direct information what the Apple software does but I would be curious to find out. If anybody has a link to a page about Apple's emulator that is technical enough to mention this level of detail I would be grateful.

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If you format the Windows XP partition as FAT32, it will be both readable and writable from within Mac OS X -- but it will also be limited to 32 GB in size (make sure the partition you set when initializing Boot Camp is 32 GB or smaller if using FAT32

When you use the Boot Camp Assistant to burn a Macintosh Windows XP drivers CD, it includes the following drivers, some of which appear to be custom-built by Apple.

Intel ChipSet Software (6.2.1)

ATI Graphics (8.24.0.0)

Intel Integrated Graphics (6.14.10.4512)

Marvel Yukon Ethernet (8.49.2.3)

SigmaTel Audio (1.0.4889.0 nd375 cp1)

SigmaTel Audio proto_A2 (1.0.4889.0 nd375 cp1)

Atheros 802.11 wireless (AirPort) (4.2.2.4)

Broadcom Wireless (4.10.40.0)

Apple Bluetooth module (1.0.0.1)

Apple Keyboard Eject Key (1.0.0.1)

Apple Keyboard Brightness (for computers with built-in displays) (1.0.0.1)

Startup Disk Control Panel for Windows XP (1.0.0.1)

The ATI graphics driver was a particular point of contention with the independent "Bootloader" hack, with a viable solution for driving the ATI X1600 chipset used in MacBook Pro and Intel-based iMacs missing. Nobodies sure how Apple created a working graphics driver for this card that works with Windows XP, but it almost certainly involved cooperation from ATI.

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Originally posted by Kurtz:

Boot Camp is not an emulator. It's a program to help you set up a dual-boot system with Windows XP on the Intel Macs. It also includes the necessary drivers for Win XP.

Once installed, Win XP runs directly on the hardware without OS X.

That's... much more lame than I expected...
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Originally posted by Redwolf:

That's... much more lame than I expected...

But so much simpler. Of course it lacks the functionality of switching between OSes and data transfer between the two, but it does allow you to run direct on the hardware without all of the potential hassles for something or another not working or working ass-slow. Virtualization can almost guarantee that a game will either have problems running at all (because of non-direct access to hardware) or running very slowly.
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