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Family Ties to World War II: A New Poll


Frenchy
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My great uncle, John Franklin Carter, was the head of one of Roosevelt's "spy" rings, gathering information through his journalistic and social circles, as well as gathering info from Germans in the US. I was pleased to see quite a bit about him in "Roosevelts Secret War" by Persico. My elderly cousins Mark and Vera were, according to family rumor, in the OSS as well, but no stories from them were ever passed down. Everyone else was either too old or young to take part.

Of course there were all the people in my wife''s family who vanished in the holocaust, or fighting as partisans in Russia.

Never Again!

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Originally posted by Boo Radley:

My father the comedian.

Shame he did not pass it on.

Grandfather was drafted in 1937 into the 13. (cannon) company of Infantryregiment 65, of 22. Air Landing Division in northern Germany. Discharged in 1939, redrafted in 1939 into a counter-battery observation unit (B30) - so he ended up going to Holland anyway for a few days in 1940.

Their job was to figure out where enemy guns are firing from by spotting their gunflash, and then direct own fire onto them to silence them. He went through Poland, Holland, and France, to finally end in East Prussia in 1941. Participated in the advance on Leningrad, occupation of Kingissepp, and his unit was attached to the infantry division that captured a Leningrad tram. Then he occupied an OP in the tower of the church at the Czar's palace Peterhof. From there to the Volkhov, Mga and Ssinjavino for the Ladoga battles and Kirichi/Tchudovo.

The retreat started in Jan. 44. When they had almost made it he was cut off, and with four comrades saw a Soviet infantry company charging up to the cemetary they were defending. When he thought all was lost, artillery defensive fire tore the Russian soldiers to pieces 'poor sods, but what can you do, it was us or them', is what he said. Shortly after that severely wounded in a partisan attack - he still carries a Soviet bullet in his chestbone. He was a Corporal/Sergeant (Unteroffizier) at the time.

Evacuated, sent to Denmark by a well-meaning lieutenant with five other NCOs, instead of back to the front, deserted two weeks before the end of the war, captured by the British on the Elbe, released because of his wound, and walked home. First one to arrive home in the village in June 1945. Married my grandmother and spend a lot of his time thereafter running the county association of the association of war victims. He is still alive.

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Originally posted by Boo Radley:

My father the comedian.

Shame he did not pass it on.

Grandfather was drafted in 1937 into the 13. (cannon) company of Infantryregiment 65, of 22. Air Landing Division in northern Germany. Discharged in 1939, redrafted in 1939 into a counter-battery observation unit (B30) - so he ended up going to Holland anyway for a few days in 1940.

Their job was to figure out where enemy guns are firing from by spotting their gunflash, and then direct own fire onto them to silence them. He went through Poland, Holland, and France, to finally end in East Prussia in 1941. Participated in the advance on Leningrad, occupation of Kingissepp, and his unit was attached to the infantry division that captured a Leningrad tram. Then he occupied an OP in the tower of the church at the Czar's palace Peterhof. From there to the Volkhov, Mga and Ssinjavino for the Ladoga battles and Kirichi/Tchudovo.

The retreat started in Jan. 44. When they had almost made it he was cut off, and with four comrades saw a Soviet infantry company charging up to the cemetary they were defending. When he thought all was lost, artillery defensive fire tore the Russian soldiers to pieces 'poor sods, but what can you do, it was us or them', is what he said. Shortly after that severely wounded in a partisan attack - he still carries a Soviet bullet in his chestbone. He was a Corporal/Sergeant (Unteroffizier) at the time.

Evacuated, sent to Denmark by a well-meaning lieutenant with five other NCOs, instead of back to the front, deserted two weeks before the end of the war, captured by the British on the Elbe, released because of his wound, and walked home. First one to arrive home in the village in June 1945. Married my grandmother and spend a lot of his time thereafter running the county association of the association of war victims. He is still alive.

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Originally posted by Boo Radley:

My father the comedian.

Shame he did not pass it on.

Grandfather was drafted in 1937 into the 13. (cannon) company of Infantryregiment 65, of 22. Air Landing Division in northern Germany. Discharged in 1939, redrafted in 1939 into a counter-battery observation unit (B30) - so he ended up going to Holland anyway for a few days in 1940.

Their job was to figure out where enemy guns are firing from by spotting their gunflash, and then direct own fire onto them to silence them. He went through Poland, Holland, and France, to finally end in East Prussia in 1941. Participated in the advance on Leningrad, occupation of Kingissepp, and his unit was attached to the infantry division that captured a Leningrad tram. Then he occupied an OP in the tower of the church at the Czar's palace Peterhof. From there to the Volkhov, Mga and Ssinjavino for the Ladoga battles and Kirichi/Tchudovo.

The retreat started in Jan. 44. When they had almost made it he was cut off, and with four comrades saw a Soviet infantry company charging up to the cemetary they were defending. When he thought all was lost, artillery defensive fire tore the Russian soldiers to pieces 'poor sods, but what can you do, it was us or them', is what he said. Shortly after that severely wounded in a partisan attack - he still carries a Soviet bullet in his chestbone. He was a Corporal/Sergeant (Unteroffizier) at the time.

Evacuated, sent to Denmark by a well-meaning lieutenant with five other NCOs, instead of back to the front, deserted two weeks before the end of the war, captured by the British on the Elbe, released because of his wound, and walked home. First one to arrive home in the village in June 1945. Married my grandmother and spend a lot of his time thereafter running the county association of the association of war victims. He is still alive.

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My father was on a Destroyer in the North Atlantic. He was 17 when he signed up after graduating early. One uncle on my mothers side was shot down while piloting p40s for the RCAFover North Africa. He spent 4 years in a German POW Camp. Another uncle was at Guadalcanal.

My fathers best man had a couple of Spitfires shot out from under him during the Battle of Britain. And yes I know I am youngish to have tales of such (I am 31)...however my siblings are all much older than I. Perhaps an issue with tactics?

B

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My father was on a Destroyer in the North Atlantic. He was 17 when he signed up after graduating early. One uncle on my mothers side was shot down while piloting p40s for the RCAFover North Africa. He spent 4 years in a German POW Camp. Another uncle was at Guadalcanal.

My fathers best man had a couple of Spitfires shot out from under him during the Battle of Britain. And yes I know I am youngish to have tales of such (I am 31)...however my siblings are all much older than I. Perhaps an issue with tactics?

B

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My father was on a Destroyer in the North Atlantic. He was 17 when he signed up after graduating early. One uncle on my mothers side was shot down while piloting p40s for the RCAFover North Africa. He spent 4 years in a German POW Camp. Another uncle was at Guadalcanal.

My fathers best man had a couple of Spitfires shot out from under him during the Battle of Britain. And yes I know I am youngish to have tales of such (I am 31)...however my siblings are all much older than I. Perhaps an issue with tactics?

B

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Mu father was a GM2 Seabee and served in the Okinawa campaign.

My uncle John was also a Seabee in a Naval Maintainence Bn and was in the Russell islands from 43 till th4e end of the war.

My uncle Bill, who passed away last summer, was a mustang US Army officer who served in New Guinea and the Phillipines. He won a silver and three bronze stars in WW II and retired from the reserves in the mid sixties.

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Mu father was a GM2 Seabee and served in the Okinawa campaign.

My uncle John was also a Seabee in a Naval Maintainence Bn and was in the Russell islands from 43 till th4e end of the war.

My uncle Bill, who passed away last summer, was a mustang US Army officer who served in New Guinea and the Phillipines. He won a silver and three bronze stars in WW II and retired from the reserves in the mid sixties.

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Mu father was a GM2 Seabee and served in the Okinawa campaign.

My uncle John was also a Seabee in a Naval Maintainence Bn and was in the Russell islands from 43 till th4e end of the war.

My uncle Bill, who passed away last summer, was a mustang US Army officer who served in New Guinea and the Phillipines. He won a silver and three bronze stars in WW II and retired from the reserves in the mid sixties.

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My father was with the 1st Marine Division in the Pacific and fought on Cape Gloucester, Peleliu, and Okinawa. He earn 2 bronze stars for heroic acts. He never talked about his experiences until the last few years. Ocassionally he will remember something now and will relate some details. I have an uncle who was also a marine but was wounded on Peleliu and another uncle who was a waist gunner on a B-17 that was shot down and the French underground helped him back to England. All these guys are heroes as far as I am concerned......

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My father was with the 1st Marine Division in the Pacific and fought on Cape Gloucester, Peleliu, and Okinawa. He earn 2 bronze stars for heroic acts. He never talked about his experiences until the last few years. Ocassionally he will remember something now and will relate some details. I have an uncle who was also a marine but was wounded on Peleliu and another uncle who was a waist gunner on a B-17 that was shot down and the French underground helped him back to England. All these guys are heroes as far as I am concerned......

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My father was with the 1st Marine Division in the Pacific and fought on Cape Gloucester, Peleliu, and Okinawa. He earn 2 bronze stars for heroic acts. He never talked about his experiences until the last few years. Ocassionally he will remember something now and will relate some details. I have an uncle who was also a marine but was wounded on Peleliu and another uncle who was a waist gunner on a B-17 that was shot down and the French underground helped him back to England. All these guys are heroes as far as I am concerned......

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My grandfather was a tank commander (Stuarts) with 1AD. Shipped out with them to Ireland and then to NA. Was part of Ward's counterattack at Sidi Bou Zid where he was one of the few survivors of his company. Awarded Bronze Star for holding off a German infantry attack with his .50 cal.

Fought at Naples, Casino and Anzio. Deamed essential to the unit and so got to fight the entire war in Italy finally ending up in a little town by the French/Italian border.

One uncle was an infantryman at Anzio. He nearly drowned when his landing craft dropped ramp on a sand bar and he jumped off into water over his head. One of his buddies pulled him out.

My father-in-law was in 3/47 INF 9th ID. He was in the first wave of replacements after Normandy and fought around St. Lo. Wounded his first day in combat when a mortar took away most of his right calf. Rejoined his unit just in time for the Huertgen Forrest. Wounded a second time after a week in combat. The round hit his left hand, went through the stock of his M1, and lodged in his shirt pocket without puncturing his t-shirt.

Spent the rest of the war guarding POW work parties in Paris. Joined the Air Force when they were separated from the Army and retired a Senior Master Sergeant.

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My grandfather was a tank commander (Stuarts) with 1AD. Shipped out with them to Ireland and then to NA. Was part of Ward's counterattack at Sidi Bou Zid where he was one of the few survivors of his company. Awarded Bronze Star for holding off a German infantry attack with his .50 cal.

Fought at Naples, Casino and Anzio. Deamed essential to the unit and so got to fight the entire war in Italy finally ending up in a little town by the French/Italian border.

One uncle was an infantryman at Anzio. He nearly drowned when his landing craft dropped ramp on a sand bar and he jumped off into water over his head. One of his buddies pulled him out.

My father-in-law was in 3/47 INF 9th ID. He was in the first wave of replacements after Normandy and fought around St. Lo. Wounded his first day in combat when a mortar took away most of his right calf. Rejoined his unit just in time for the Huertgen Forrest. Wounded a second time after a week in combat. The round hit his left hand, went through the stock of his M1, and lodged in his shirt pocket without puncturing his t-shirt.

Spent the rest of the war guarding POW work parties in Paris. Joined the Air Force when they were separated from the Army and retired a Senior Master Sergeant.

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My grandfather was a tank commander (Stuarts) with 1AD. Shipped out with them to Ireland and then to NA. Was part of Ward's counterattack at Sidi Bou Zid where he was one of the few survivors of his company. Awarded Bronze Star for holding off a German infantry attack with his .50 cal.

Fought at Naples, Casino and Anzio. Deamed essential to the unit and so got to fight the entire war in Italy finally ending up in a little town by the French/Italian border.

One uncle was an infantryman at Anzio. He nearly drowned when his landing craft dropped ramp on a sand bar and he jumped off into water over his head. One of his buddies pulled him out.

My father-in-law was in 3/47 INF 9th ID. He was in the first wave of replacements after Normandy and fought around St. Lo. Wounded his first day in combat when a mortar took away most of his right calf. Rejoined his unit just in time for the Huertgen Forrest. Wounded a second time after a week in combat. The round hit his left hand, went through the stock of his M1, and lodged in his shirt pocket without puncturing his t-shirt.

Spent the rest of the war guarding POW work parties in Paris. Joined the Air Force when they were separated from the Army and retired a Senior Master Sergeant.

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Great topic!

My maternal Grandfather was a Merrill's Marauder that fought in the Burma/China/India theater. He fought on Guadalcanal before volunteering to be part of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional) later to be known as Merrill's Marauders. He too received a couple of Bronze Stars a purple heart and a Presidential Unit Citation. These guys went through absolute hell, and this was after his time on Guadalcanal. Every single Marauder had to be evacuated by the end of their mission due to combat casualties, malaria and dysentary. Everyone. Today's Rangers trace their unit lineage back to the Marauders. Here is a link if anyone is interested.

http://www.marauder.org/

My father's older half-brother was a bombadier on a B-25 in Europe, mostly flying supplies in to the French underground. Never dropped a bomb though!

[ January 09, 2004, 06:06 PM: Message edited by: Lord Dragon ]

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Great topic!

My maternal Grandfather was a Merrill's Marauder that fought in the Burma/China/India theater. He fought on Guadalcanal before volunteering to be part of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional) later to be known as Merrill's Marauders. He too received a couple of Bronze Stars a purple heart and a Presidential Unit Citation. These guys went through absolute hell, and this was after his time on Guadalcanal. Every single Marauder had to be evacuated by the end of their mission due to combat casualties, malaria and dysentary. Everyone. Today's Rangers trace their unit lineage back to the Marauders. Here is a link if anyone is interested.

http://www.marauder.org/

My father's older half-brother was a bombadier on a B-25 in Europe, mostly flying supplies in to the French underground. Never dropped a bomb though!

[ January 09, 2004, 06:06 PM: Message edited by: Lord Dragon ]

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Great topic!

My maternal Grandfather was a Merrill's Marauder that fought in the Burma/China/India theater. He fought on Guadalcanal before volunteering to be part of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional) later to be known as Merrill's Marauders. He too received a couple of Bronze Stars a purple heart and a Presidential Unit Citation. These guys went through absolute hell, and this was after his time on Guadalcanal. Every single Marauder had to be evacuated by the end of their mission due to combat casualties, malaria and dysentary. Everyone. Today's Rangers trace their unit lineage back to the Marauders. Here is a link if anyone is interested.

http://www.marauder.org/

My father's older half-brother was a bombadier on a B-25 in Europe, mostly flying supplies in to the French underground. Never dropped a bomb though!

[ January 09, 2004, 06:06 PM: Message edited by: Lord Dragon ]

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My paternal grandfather (who just passed away; RIP), was in the Dutch resistance. He never said exactly what he did but I do know he was captured in '44 and sent to a concentration camp. Later, while he was being transferred to another one as the Allies advanced he jumped off the train with a friend and escaped. One of his brothers was regrettably in the Dutch SS and disappeared after the war.

My wife's maternal grandfather was an American soldier in Italy, wounded twice with two purple hearts.

edit: I can't believe I forgot my maternal grandfather. He was in the Dutch cavalry (no kidding!) but had pneumonia when Germany invaded.

[ January 12, 2004, 01:08 AM: Message edited by: Konstantine ]

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My paternal grandfather (who just passed away; RIP), was in the Dutch resistance. He never said exactly what he did but I do know he was captured in '44 and sent to a concentration camp. Later, while he was being transferred to another one as the Allies advanced he jumped off the train with a friend and escaped. One of his brothers was regrettably in the Dutch SS and disappeared after the war.

My wife's maternal grandfather was an American soldier in Italy, wounded twice with two purple hearts.

edit: I can't believe I forgot my maternal grandfather. He was in the Dutch cavalry (no kidding!) but had pneumonia when Germany invaded.

[ January 12, 2004, 01:08 AM: Message edited by: Konstantine ]

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My paternal grandfather (who just passed away; RIP), was in the Dutch resistance. He never said exactly what he did but I do know he was captured in '44 and sent to a concentration camp. Later, while he was being transferred to another one as the Allies advanced he jumped off the train with a friend and escaped. One of his brothers was regrettably in the Dutch SS and disappeared after the war.

My wife's maternal grandfather was an American soldier in Italy, wounded twice with two purple hearts.

edit: I can't believe I forgot my maternal grandfather. He was in the Dutch cavalry (no kidding!) but had pneumonia when Germany invaded.

[ January 12, 2004, 01:08 AM: Message edited by: Konstantine ]

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