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What was the colloquial German name for a Mark IV ?


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Originally posted by Philippe:

This was posted by Christian Ankerstjerne in a discussion board at missing-lynx.com.

quote

Pz.Kpfw. I Landwirtschaftlicher Schlepper

Pz.Kpfw. II Landwirtschaftlicher Schlepper 100

Pz.Kpfw. III Zugführerwagen

Pz.Kpfw. IV Begleitswagen

Pz.Kpfw. Panther

Pz.Kpfw. Tiger Ausf. E

Pz.Kpfw. Tiger Ausf. B

unquote

While I'm still chuckling over the names of the Panzer I and II, I have no idea how seriously to take this list. I wonder to what extent these words represent actually linguistic usage. They look a bit like official names rather than colloquial ones.

Any comments?

The names of the Pz. I & II in this context are because of the ban on tank research under the Treaty of Versailles, hence the Germans called them (essentially) agricultural heavy tractors.

For the Pz. III, it's called a platoon command vehicle - from the times when a tank platoon was mixed - one slightly heavier Pz. III to go along with the Pz. IIs in the platoon.

The Pz. IV is named as a support vehicle owing to its stint with the short 75mm gun to better fight against infantry than the 50mm guns on the Pz IIIs, before this was largely taken over by the Pz. IIIN, which was the support vehicle assigned to heavy tank platoons, to combat pesky threats that were a bit of a waste for 88mm rounds.

The Pz. V (Panther) is simply listed as a Panther, so there you go.

The Pz. VI, Tiger, is listed "twice" for the different versions. The Panzerkampfwagen VI Ausf. E was the operating official name for the Tiger tank.

The second listing as a Tiger (Ausf. B) is for the 'Königstiger' (Bengal Tiger, for some reason generally translated as 'King Tiger'), or "King Tiger", "Tiger II", or "Royal Tiger", depending on your own country's expression for the tank.

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Originally posted by jBrereton:

The second listing as a Tiger (Ausf. B) is for the 'Königstiger' (Bengal Tiger, for some reason generally translated as 'King Tiger'

Maybe because that's what it means in German? I guess it is possible that Germans would call Bengal tigers "koenigs tigers," but "King Tiger" is the literal translation.
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Originally posted by stoat:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by jBrereton:

The second listing as a Tiger (Ausf. B) is for the 'Königstiger' (Bengal Tiger, for some reason generally translated as 'King Tiger'

Maybe because that's what it means in German? I guess it is possible that Germans would call Bengal tigers "koenigs tigers," but "King Tiger" is the literal translation. </font>
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Originally posted by Andreas:

Sink. And pretty good at it it was too.

All the best

Andreas

Only if launched stupidly too far from the beach by commanders who didnt have a clue. On the Brit beaches though it was used to good effect. As usual a weapon is only as good as the guys who know how to employ it effectively.
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Originally posted by GSX:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Andreas:

Sink. And pretty good at it it was too.

All the best

Andreas

Only if launched stupidly too far from the beach by commanders who didnt have a clue. On the Brit beaches though it was used to good effect. As usual a weapon is only as good as the guys who know how to employ it effectively. </font>
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Just got done reading through Von Dinklevitz's definative and exhaustive study "End Connectors, Tow Hooks & Sponson Boxes of the Third Reich" (Stinkgarter Press, 1971) and on pg. 371 there is a footnote refering to a "Panzerkampfwagon IV Ausf Q Rucksatz 11/werknummer 11721R Type VII/c (improvisiert)" and that it was "commonly refered to by those who crewed them as 'Zuckermehlkloß des tödlichen Liebefilmkanisters'". I am not sure if this pertains to this particular subvarient, or to all PzkfIV's...Just thought I'd throw this into the mix... Zamo (back from the dead)

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Originally posted by Andreas:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by GSX:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Andreas:

Sink. And pretty good at it it was too.

All the best

Andreas

Only if launched stupidly too far from the beach by commanders who didnt have a clue. On the Brit beaches though it was used to good effect. As usual a weapon is only as good as the guys who know how to employ it effectively. </font>
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In an interview on the Panzers episode of Modern Marvels on the History Channel (U.S.), I heard something under the VO when a native German speaker who'd been a driver/mechanic in Panzers during the War called the Panther the "Panzer funf." This strongly suggests the Panzer IV would've been similarly referred to, as in "Panzer vier."

Regards,

John Kettler

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