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What was the colloquial German name for a Mark IV ?


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There was a thread on a related topic a couple of years ago but I haven't a clue what to search for.

What word (besides Panzer) did your average German use when he was talking about one of their tanks?

The Panzer VI series were Tigers, and I'm assuming they were referred to as Tigers. (?)

The Panzer V series were Panthers, and I'm assuming they were referred to as Panthers. (?)

What about the Panzer IV ? Did it have an animal name, either for the series or for the individual models?

I'm not asking what the Allies called the different German tanks because I understand that we called everything a Tiger.

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When i have read memoirs such as Panzer Meyers and Rommels dairy for example they only ever refer to them, as far as i can recall, as Mark IVs (they have been translated from German into English however).

Same for the Panzer III, II (other then the lynx iirc)etc The only ones they called by any other names are like the ones you have mentioned, the Tigers and Panthers etc

Whenever they give the size of there force, its like:

X x Mark IV

X x Panthers

Although that doesnt nesseceraly mean that average landser or panzer crew member like you said, did not have a nickname for them.

I'm not asking what the Allies called the different German tanks because I understand that we called everything a Tiger.

I know you havnt asked for this but, as far as i understand we Brits called them the Mark IV too, the only ones we gave a different name to where the long barreled Mark IVs, which was named the "Mark IV Special".

Although that was in the desert so dont know if that carried on into Europe.

Hope that helps you somewhat.

[ August 13, 2007, 10:54 AM: Message edited by: The_Enigma ]

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Along the lines of unsolicited information, the Soviets referred to the MarkIV almost without exception as a T-4. The MkIII was a T-3, the Panther was a T-5, and the Tiger...wait for it...was a T-6.

And just so everything is clear, the Russian word for tank is, unsurprisingly, "tank". Thus no extra points for guessing what the "T" stands for.

Assault guns had a slightly better nickname, in general it was a non-StuG assault gun with an anti-tank capable cannon, the Soviets called it a "Ferdinand." Different types were distinguished by the size of a gun, therefore, you have a "75mm Ferdinand", an "88mm Ferdinand", and (theoretically anyway) a "128mm Ferdinand". Sometimes StuGs were referred to as "SP Gun", and sometimes as "Ferdinand".

I don't think that will help, however, it is WW2 trivia.

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Is it Tanya?

Do i win a cookie?

BZZZZZZZZZT!

I'm sorry Comrade, your answer is incorrect. :(

Would you like to bet all your winnings and guess again, or accept an all-expense-paid trip (one way) to Magadan?

Plenty of fresh air, lots of close personal relationships guaranteed, and a winter sports paradise 11 months of the year! :D

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You can imagine if there was even an obscure nickname for the pzIV Tamiya modeling would've been all over it in the 1970s! I think I read somewhere (a long time ago) that kits with 'names' tended to sell better. An M36 'Jackson' would sell better than an M36, etc. If three drunk guys had got together on the outskirts of Warsaw and started referring to their pzIV as the "Wild Boar" in dispatches I'm sure Tamiya would've released their 'PzIV Wild Boar' kit in the mid-seventies. :D

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Originally posted by The_Enigma:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Michael Dorosh:

"Mark" is a British word

It was in the bible first... or are you suggesting that Al Murray was right all along when he stated that God is indeed British, which is why we dont have earthquakes in this country... </font>
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Originally posted by Michael Dorosh:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by The_Enigma:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Michael Dorosh:

"Mark" is a British word

It was in the bible first... or are you suggesting that Al Murray was right all along when he stated that God is indeed British, which is why we dont have earthquakes in this country... </font>
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Originally posted by Nero's Cat:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Michael Dorosh:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by The_Enigma:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Michael Dorosh:

"Mark" is a British word

It was in the bible first... or are you suggesting that Al Murray was right all along when he stated that God is indeed British, which is why we dont have earthquakes in this country... </font>
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Originally posted by Michael Dorosh:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by The_Enigma:

</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Michael Dorosh:

"Mark" is a British word

It was in the bible first... or are you suggesting that Al Murray was right all along when he stated that God is indeed British, which is why we dont have earthquakes in this country... </font>
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Originally posted by thewood:

We all know the bible was written in American, something that will shock our Canuck brothers (who won't admit they speak American too)

What? But they told us in Sunday school that God dictated the Bible to King James in Shakespearean English...?!?
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I hope not. This is a real question and worth knowing the answer. I had a copy of Manstein at one point -- if I can find it I'll see what he calls things. I keep thinking of the A-10 Thunderbolt/Warthog -- the real name for something may be different from the official name. Having said that simply calling something a Panzer IV sounds familiar, and quite possibly right. I have trouble believing that anyone other than the manufacturer ever actually uttered the words Panzerkampfwagon IV H.

The alternative to all this, I suppose, is to post the question at one of the WW II history sites, but I don't belong to any of their forums.

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On Red Orchestra, the German-speaking players call them "pan-ser feer"(spelled phonetically), which is "panzer four" literally. I realize they're not WW2 veterans, but they must have gotten the term from somewhere.

Also, I have read that the Panther was called a Panzer V until late in the war.

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I think they called them "Tin Cans" or "Tin Canzers" or "Tin Canzapantswagon" something along those lines.

I know what youre driving at, like the Sherman

was renamed a "Tommy Cooker"

The Italians decided to name their Battleships after famous victories, policy changed after they couldnt think of any.

Btw Mel B, Posh + Ginger went Stateside, LOL

[ August 14, 2007, 04:01 PM: Message edited by: highliner ]

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