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Arty Delay Times Variable?


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I realize that delay times displayed for spotters when given a target are estimates; but are the actual delays also widely variable?

For example, in a PBEM I have two identical spotters (same guns/same experience). When I give one a target in LOS (blue line)the delay is only two minutes. The other spotter, when given a target in LOS, shows an estimated delay of six minutes. According to the manual, this means at best the guy with the six minute delay will be delivering shortly before six minutes, while the other spotter could be delivering the goods at shortly before two minutes at best. Is this correct, or have I found something? I have a file if this is a bug.

Two identical spotters....four minute difference in displayed estimate of time until the fun begins, with both are targetting points within LOS.

[ July 31, 2003, 04:27 PM: Message edited by: CrankyKris ]

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Hmm.. I can only think of a few possible answers:

First: Maybe one of them has a radio and the other has a landline? Im not sure if this affects speeds for arty delivery though, and I have a suspicion it may have more to deal with their movement speeds..

Second: Is one of the spotters say.. Battalion level while the other is say, Corps level? That would have a definite effect.

Third:Are you sure both spotters had targets that were in LoS?

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Np

The higher the level - battalion, brigade, regiment, division, corps, army, etc (did I get it right?) the longer the delay b/c communications delays and whatnot...

edited because of language =D

[ July 31, 2003, 10:59 PM: Message edited by: Sublime ]

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Originally posted by Sublime:

The higher the level - battalion, brigade, regiment, division, corps, army, etc (did I get it right?)...

Brigades, although slightly larger in most cases, can in most armies be considered equivalent, B/C/E regiments being somewhat of a special case that I won't go into here unless requested.

Michael

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I've ALWAYS wondered what the difference was between a regiment and a brigade. When I was in the army, our armor battalion belonged to a brigade headed by a full colonel. I believe there was an infantry battalion in our brigade and we had a self-propelled 152mm howitzer battalion too. What's a regiment? Is it similar to the cavalry having troops where we had companies (or is a troop equivalent to a platoon?)?

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Originally posted by CrankyKris:

I've ALWAYS wondered what the difference was between a regiment and a brigade. When I was in the army, our armor battalion belonged to a brigade headed by a full colonel. I believe there was an infantry battalion in our brigade and we had a self-propelled 152mm howitzer battalion too. What's a regiment? Is it similar to the cavalry having troops where we had companies (or is a troop equivalent to a platoon?)?

Oh boy. :rolleyes: You've just opened about three different cans of worms.

See, the problem is that different armies in WW II used somewhat differing organizations. And different armies used the same terms in different ways.

I think for now I will confine myself to the US Army because it is the one I am most familiar with and let other posters have a chance to weigh in with their favorite forces. Also, it can be shown that in most cases, all armies had roughly equivalent organizations even though they differed in detail and in what they were called.

In WW II the US Army was mostly composed of infantry divisions. Each infantry division was comprised of three infantry regiments, each commanded by a full colonel, and an artillery regiment commanded usually (but not always) by a brigadier general, plus supporting troops like engineers, AT, AA, reconnaisance, signals, medical, transport, etc. in battalion or more often company strength.

An infantry regiment would consist of three battalions of infantry, a cannon company and various minor support units. A regimental combat team (RCT), which was a kind of task force intended to operate independently of a division, would consist of an infantry regiment with various attachments, usually a battalion of artillery, a company of engineers, maybe up to a battalion of tanks or TDs, med, signals, and whatever else is was thought they might need and was available.

There was rarely anything in the US Army at this time that was called a brigade, but there were units that were more or less equivalent to brigades. The most prominent were the combat commands of armored divisions. These were originally intended to be headquarters to which battalions could be assigned out of a pool in the division to make up task forces tailored for a specific mission, like the German Kampfgruppen, but in practice it was found for various reasons (usually having to do with smoother coöperation between arms) to assign units on a more or less permanent basis. A common grouping was a battalion of tanks, a battalion of armored infantry, and a battalion of SP artillery. These were then reinforced with engineers, TD, etc. They were usually commanded by full colonels. I believe in these you can see the origins of the units you served in.

Whew! I think I'll rest for a while and give someone else a shot at this, correct my mistakes, and so on. Feel free to ask more specific questions.

Michael

Added: There is some very good information on the Australian army (which is essentially the same as the British and other Commonwealth armies) at this site posted by Lars in another thread.

[ August 01, 2003, 02:59 AM: Message edited by: Michael Emrys ]

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Thanks, Michael, I see now how it works. I believe we did have an engineer unit, and the infantry had M113s, lots of them. They must have been armored infantry (mechanized?).

I blew my CrankyKris alias in the Peng Thread awhile ago by accident, so I might as well post as Treeburst here. I'm going into lurker mode again anyway. Thanks again for the info. I really appreciate your taking the time. You grogs are alright in my book. smile.gif

Treeburst155 out.

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Of course, some of those many friends would like to bash his brains in for being an idjit and dropping off the face of the earth without so much as a "I'm taking my football and going home so my Dad can beat up your Dad" bit so we would know he was merely demented, rather than dead and demented.

Bastiche.

Good to see you back, TB. You should stay a bit.

Steve

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