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injuries from hand held AT devices


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People get hurt all the time by backblast, even in training. While they train you to look back, during a fight with people and vehicles running around it is easy to forget or to have someone run behind you right after you check.

CM does somewhat simulate this by suppressing you if you fire one in a building or if you are behind someone who does but I can't recall any actual casualties.

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Anybody's seen the classic german movie "Die Brücke"? In it there's a young soldier firing a Panzerfaust inside a house without looking back...

The result is, well, ugly...

If you can get your hands on a copy, make sure to grab it. IMO one of the best war movies ever made.

[ February 06, 2003, 03:00 AM: Message edited by: ParaBellum ]

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Although the PIAT didn't have a backblast it had a kick from the projectile propellant. the firer was supposed to brace himself sufficiently to utilise this kick to recock the spring mechanism. If he failed, and it could be tricky, he had to perform an awkward and protracted manual cock.

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hmmm, I'm thinking that it wouldn't be too

hard to model injuries - every time it

fires there is a chance of injury - i.e. if

the weapon is being handled by conscripts well, then the chances are higher....

(also that'd be kinda cool if gun tubes could

occaisionally go - like very rarely but

never the less sometimes....)

C.

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Originally posted by Rick614:

I was under the impression that there was in actually no such thing as the "knee mortar" in the Pacific. US troops had thought the Japanese had such a weapon but turned out to be something else. More along the lines of a rifle grenade if I remember right.

Yes and no. There was a real weapon that came to be called a 'knee mortar' in GI slang. Technically, it was the Japanese Model 89 (1929) 50mm Grenade Discharger. It was indeed a small, one-man mortar probably similar in power to a Rifle Grenade. However, is was most definitely NOT designed to be fired by resting the baseplate against the thigh, which is apparently what a lot of GIs thought. It was designed to be fired with the baseplate against the ground, just like a larger mortar.

The shape of the baseplate is such that it looks like it's designed to fit over your thigh, which is probably the origin of the confusion among GIs. As mentioned, firing a 'knee mortar' with the baseplate on your thigh quite often results in a broken femur.

Cheers,

YD

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We used to say that privates are like puppies, always sticking their nose into things that will get them killed.

Do any of you who were in the military remember the NCO aura of invulnerability? Why is it that when yelling at a private for handling duds the NCO most often feels he has to pick the stupid thing up?

More historical faux paus:

During the age of muzzle loading cannon many soldiers ended up with broken ankles from trying to stop cannon balls with their feet. They figured that if you could see it rolling along the ground it couldn't possibly be dangerous. :rolleyes:

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Originally posted by ParaBellum:

Anybody's seen the classic german movie "Die Brücke"? In it there's a young soldier firing a Panzerfaust inside a house without looking back...

The result is, well, ugly...

If you can get your hands on a copy, make sure to grab it. IMO one of the best war movies ever made.

I second that. Seen the flick in school in history. Very moving.

And great scenes with M4 Shermans.

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