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Well, I took the big step.......


Comrade Trapp
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Well, I took the big step and enlisted in the Marine Corps today, I finally got to find out for myself how much fun MEPS is. I enlisted as a 0311 (Rifleman) and will be leaving for Parris Island on August 2, 2004. (August 2004..... am I gonna miss SC 2? :eek: )

Just posting this for the hell of it.

And so this will be SC related, I will apologize to the guys I have games going with who are wondering where the hell I've been for the past 2 weeks. Just send me a e-mail when your able to continue.

Comrade Trapp

[ September 08, 2003, 11:31 PM: Message edited by: Comrade Trapp ]

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I can't speak for the Marines, I was in the comparatively civilian Air Force, but I remember a lot of guys even there going crazy because they were trying to live in the barracks and back home at the same time. It doesn't work.

Blinders would probably be a good issue; 18th century grenedier uniforms came with high, stiff collars so the troopers would be less inclined to look turn their heads. In those days sublety was never a big issue.

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Originally posted by JerseyJohn:

Blinders would probably be a good issue; 18th century grenedier uniforms came with high, stiff collars so the troopers would be less inclined to look turn their heads. In those days sublety was never a big issue.

Actually, according to R. Lee Ermey (the most famous Marine of all), the 18th century Marine uniform's high, stiff leather collar was for protecting the Marine from any blows to the neck area (blunting slashes, etc.). Since it was largely impractical, it was discontinued after not very long, but the name stuck.

Logan Hartke

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True, I'm a great fan of his show, till he becomes too abusive and I flick the channel.

The high stiff collars I'm talking about were the ones worn by European grenediers, most notably the Prussians and British. No doubt they did help protect the sides of the neck, but at the trade off of not being able to look around.

For a marine, intended for use on shipboard and as a sniper, neck protection would come second to field of vision and being able to move with greater freedom -- in battle they had to climb rope ladders to act as sharpshooters.

Grenediers, on the other hand, were trained to fight straight ahead. With heavy lead flying around and troops standing rigidly in close formation looking around was likely to bring on fear.

But getting back to the original message. Aside from guys trying to keep up with two lives simultaneously, there were also the ones who wanted to second guess everything, the ones who were smarter than anyone else, and on and on . . .. I found the best way to get along was to not look around much -- I didn't want to know what anyone else was doing -- and getting my job done so whoever was depending on it wouldn't end up dead.

After a few months I taped a little sign inside my footlocker. HOME SWEET HOME! and seeing that every time I opened it made a big difference.

[ September 09, 2003, 02:31 AM: Message edited by: JerseyJohn ]

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Congratulations on the enlistment choice you made. Current and former Marines understand well the emotions you are feeling right now and look forward to your graduation when we can welcome you to the family. I started off as an 0311 myself, though in San Diego, not Parris Island.

In the General Discussion area, there are a few older topics dealing with how to get prepared for boot camp. You have almost a year, put the time to good use so some parts of boot are a cakewalk. If you'd like, e-mail me and I can give you an old salts viewpoint.

Again, congrats on your choice.

[ September 09, 2003, 03:31 AM: Message edited by: Shaka of Carthage ]

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Trapp --- Good Luck in the military. I was never in the service, but here's my 2-cents if I was entering. Read some books on Basic Training stuff so you can get a head start. Go spend a couple of weeks camping, hiking, climbing, & eating non-civilian food...put yourself thru some personal pre-Boot-Camp to transition the process.

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Congratulations.

I spent three years in the US Army. Boot camp is all a mind game. I never saw or heard of any marine or soldier drop out because of the physical aspect. They will work on that with you. Or better, they will work you into physical shape one way or another. But all the guys who drop out did so because of the mental head games they do. Perhaps we could tell a few stories here... oh no, you will find out for yourself. Congratulations and remember you CAN DO IT and will do.

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I just wrote a long posting about Turkey here, completely missing the Thread I was aiming at!

Anyway, it's been moved to the Decision Tree area, where I guess it belongs but after this halucination I'm not really certain.

Once again, Give'em Hell Comrade! -- now if I can just locate the Thread I'm actually writing in . . .. :confused:

[ September 09, 2003, 09:21 AM: Message edited by: JerseyJohn ]

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Comrade Trapp,

While I have never served, I will always support our troops and I know they are the true heroes in the USA: not Harrison Ford or Shaquille ONeal or Woody Allen or <your favorite rappers name here, since I prefer progressive rock music and not the monotonous drum track akin to a lone tennis shoe in the dryer, but that is another topic which is not only off thread, it is probably off Forum and off Website>.

Thanks for your decision and commitment to serve and protect our nation and its interests.

Regardless of what we think of our politicians, we know our service men and women are the best in the world. If only we had a president which knew when an more importantly HOW to use it.

Leopard

P.S. I am anxious for Wesley Clark's decision about 2004, since Colin Powell isn't interested.

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Congratulations on your enlistment. From my own experience the best advice I would give prior to basic training is to get as fit as you can possibly be. This will make the physical demands on you much easier, although it won't alter the lack of sleep you'll doubtless endure, or avert the psychological barrage from your instructors.. smile.gif

Concentrate on cardiovascular fitness rather than weight training. If you're over-muscled it will slow you down, while a good level of cardiovascular fitness will give you the endurance you will need.

Best of luck. Nil desperandum! ;)

[ September 09, 2003, 03:54 PM: Message edited by: Archibald ]

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Thanks for the congrats guys, its very much appreciated.

Posted by Bill Macon: Seriously, congratulations. But, 2004? They need you yesterday.
Unfortunately I still have to finish my senior year of high school before I can ship out and they don't really give you too much of a choice on a ship date. If I had it my way I would be shipping out a week after my HS graduation.

Posted by Shaka: If you'd like, e-mail me and I can give you an old salts viewpoint.

I may have to take you up on that offer, god knows I'm gonna need all the advice I can get. :D

Thanks again guys,

Comrade Trapp

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