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There is always hope


Les the Sarge 9-1b
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Last night had to visit family.

Decided to indulge a bit of pure blind hope.

Showed my nephew Strategic Command. Played the game rather fast and without a lot of fuss on minutae.

Trashed Poland without much finesse then atacked France again without putting much thought into it.

I just wanted him to enjoy me moving things around and shooting up pieces.

He said the ultimately most important phrase "this game looks fun".

We can only hope he retains the attitude and stays with wargaming. He is in his early teens.

His dad's religious beliefs fortunately keep a wide swath of competing game titles out of the home. so wargaming might not have a lot of competition eh.

Keep yer fingers crossed.

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Well I gave two of my nephews (FPS players) SC for Christmas. Showed them how to play and then challenged them any time anywhere. First time they beat me its $20 in their pocket, 2nd time $30, 3rd $40 and so on. Shamed them about their brainless fast fingers and still no takers, but they sure trash talk.

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Great idea Les :cool:

Let's get EVERYBODY hooked on these games... that way, the resulting catharsis will eliminate bristle & bravado and BS all around the town! smile.gif

I recently gave a whole stack of computer games to a nephew and he is really thrilled... he innocently asked for my old board-game of War at Sea and... I just COULDN'T part with it, damn, why on earth would I still be attached to that... I told him he could borrow it but

... maybe I'd leave it to him in my Will...

:D LOL! Heuristic... as for my house, well, it's actually haunted and I had the devil's own time just getting him to put aside youthful superstitions and... adventure on in... :eek:

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As wargamers we always have been, and probably always will be, a niche market. Fortunately, direct online sales to the consumer apparantly make it economically viable for people like Battlefront to cater to our niche. In addition they provide a forum where we can discuss the games, as well as any other vaugely game related ramblings (like this) that may cross our minds. This is a great time to be a wargamer!

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I'll be the Devil's advocate on this one... ;)

Most wargamers, like myself, tried ol' paper wargames with it's huge, painful rulebooks... Then came wargames on computer... An improvement for us... No more '2-hours-to-prepare-the-map' or 'roll-one-dice-then-add-+1-if...' or 'Oh-God-the-cat-jump-on-Germany!!!'... Computers do all the dirty, boring work, leaving us only the fun of the grand strategy... For us, it's a big step forward because it is easier now to play our favourite passtime...

But youngster who learn that computer games are 3D, 16 millons colours clickfest... Will they be able to accept a less spectacular but more challenging type of game???...

The more the time pass (and the technology advances) the more I doubt it... We'll see more and more 'Shogun - Total War'-like games (not a bad game, mind you...) and less SC-like games...

Oh God!!!... Please prove me I'm wrong... ;)

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Originally posted by Minotaur:

I'll be the Devil's advocate on this one... ;)

But youngster who learn that computer games are 3D, 16 millons colours clickfest... Will they be able to accept a less spectacular but more challenging type of game???...

And that's only if you can drag them away from the PS2. :( I have a PS2 and an X-box myself, so I enjoy them for their strengths - primarily shooters and driving games. And nothing like lounging on the couch, pop in the disc and the games run without crashing to the desktop, fiddling with the graphics settings to get it to run okay, sound card conflict, etc.

But wargaming is for dorks as far as a lot of kids are concerned these days (well, perhaps that's always been the case :D ). I think I have my work cut out for me convincing my kids that SC is worthy of their attention, when they can be boosting fast cars in Vice City. :eek:

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I miss the classic SquadLeader, Cross of Iron, GI-Anvil.

1) Face-to-face competition

2) get to set-up your own pieces

3) Medium size game took ~3 hours

4) My favorite were the German/Russia scenarios. Germans are outnumbered 3 to 1, but have the 9-2 leader, HMG, in 2nd story building...til the Russians send the swarm.

Best thing about computers:

1) FOW, those concealment counters were stupid with no FOW on cardboard games.

2) Can find opponents & smak on the Forums. In the old days if your buddy moves away, no gaming for you.

3) Can save games without sliding in under the couch or table.

4) Don't lose pieces! Don't have to have "Surgeon's hands" to move the 1/3" counters. Remember playing SquadLeader, trying to set up the game searching for one-counter in the bag? Needles in a haystack.

5) I agree with Minotaur: adding up those combat resolution modifiers was a bitch. Language lawyer days reading the rulebook.

Stratego 1976

Risk 1979

3R 1981

SquadLeader 1982-1990

Conquistador 1986-1987

Roman Empire 1986

Circus Maximus 1986

Axis & Allies 1988-1992

CivilWar 1990-1994

Railroad Barron 1995

SC 2002-present

Axis & Allies Pacific 2002-present

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I'd add one more thing to your plusses of board wargames, john_j: ease of rules tinkering. If you decided that almost ANY aspect of the game wasn't to your liking, it was much easier to tweak it. Some computer games offer some ability to do that, but others (most? ) are just plain tinker unfriendly!

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Excellent point was made about board game rules and tinkering. Alot of your OW's (Old school Wargamers or Original Wargamers, take your pick), spent time analyzing the CRT, relative strengths of the units, terrain, victory conditions, etc. As a result, many of us took the next step and wondered why things were the way they were. And if we didn't agree, we changed it. Alot harder, if not impossible to do these days.

Wargamers were nerds or closet nerds, back before they were called nerds. How many of you admitted, even to yourselfs, that you enjoyed the library more than hanging out with your friends?

Cats and dogs were much easier to handle than the girlfriends or wifes. Even though there were a few rare ones that didn't mind being locked up, but if you had one of those, what the heck were you doing pushing counters or lead?

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As originally posted by RommelDAK:

If you decided that almost ANY aspect of the game wasn't to your liking, it was much easier to tweak it.

Yeah, this is one thing that was great fun to fool around with... adding or modifying rules to fit the kind of gaming experience you actually wanted to have. Seems like the game-makers sometimes get CLOSE to what you really want, but... not... quite.

Another thing I like to do is add unit counters from other games to a board-game that has a fairly realistic map-layout, such as Axis & Allies Europe, or Pacific.

I took some mechanized counters from PanzerBlitz and some naval-air counters & individual ship counters from World in Flames and some other assorted counters from Advanced Third Reich and... blended them in with the cool pieces that you get with A&A Europe (... love that AA-88 artillery and the Panther armor unit). It helps if you have saved all your old board-games as I have (... couldn't ever just pitch them out).

The rules I re-wrote easily accomodate these new units and after a test-game, I find that everything fits together surprisingly well... it allows you to have the exact complexity that you prefer and you can actually play the game in less than 2 years! ;)

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