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Still so much ground to cover with regard to WW2. Winter War, Blitzkrieg, North Africa, Russia 1941-1943 and so on and so forth. Modern conflicts are nice and each to his own, but I prefer the militar

I had posted awhile ago that the delays caused by BFC working with Slitherine last year on their military project for the Brits was liable to see a downstream benefit from BFC becoming used to working

I like that this is basically a sandbox. And what a sandbox! Assuming NATO forces and Warsaw Pact forces eventually are added in modules, the sky is the limit. Stuff I do now in miniatures, like Iran-

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10 minutes ago, landser said:

Hole 1 is a mean dogleg right. But maybe you could take it right over the trees there.

Yeah, golf too now

And all due to me carelessly tossing idioms around. Gotta be more circumspect.

I think we should all be proud of the inclusive nature of this fine forum.  But golf?

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8 hours ago, Lethaface said:

I think this discussion is now mixed between what defines a tank, the politics in the German army during WW2 about who controlled the Stugs and whether the Swedish 'S-tank' was capable in the anti tank role.

If the former owners didn't call it a tank and the crew had to wear artillery uniforms, I rest my case. I admit I am not an expert on the S-Tank. But the manufacturer calls it an S-Tank and with guns you can shoot at tanks too. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

The way I see it, it's a tank if the person using it calls it a tank, or if the person building it calls it a tank, or if it's used in a battlefield role that would (or could be) be performed by a tank.

Or if it's a Monday.

Or the word, "tank," is now used as a generic term for, "any vehicle that drives around on tracks," by a buddy of mine back from three tours in Afghanistan who refers to his M113 as a tank.

It seems only on forums like this are the real nitty gritty details hashed out.

I love you guys.

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24 minutes ago, General Jack Ripper said:

The way I see it, it's a tank if the person using it calls it a tank, or if the person building it calls it a tank, or if it's used in a battlefield role that would (or could be) be performed by a tank.

Or if it's a Monday.

Or the word, "tank," is now used as a generic term for, "any vehicle that drives around on tracks," by a buddy of mine back from three tours in Afghanistan who refers to his M113 as a tank.

It seems only on forums like this are the real nitty gritty details hashed out.

I love you guys.

My pacifist inclined sister called the M113 a tank when she saw one. Your buddy is among good company. 

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On 3/9/2021 at 2:55 PM, chuckdyke said:

My pacifist inclined sister called the M113 a tank when she saw one. Your buddy is among good company. 

I once saw an M113 trundling down the Eastern Freeway in Melbourne, and I remarked to my then wife, "check it out - there's a tank on the road."

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1 hour ago, Freyberg said:

I once saw an M113 trundling down the Eastern Freeway in Melbourne, and I remarked to my then wife, "check it out - there's a tank on the road."

In psychology it is called stimuli generalization. If you tell your wife there goes an 'APC' you know (subconsciously) that you must explain what an APC is. Like my sister who at best regards the armed forces as a necessarily evil.  

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On 2/16/2021 at 5:18 AM, Irididdle said:

AAAAAA, Gimme the stupid DDR helmets, oh god I can see it in my head already.

Here you go:

http://www.ddr-uniformen.com/?page_id=416

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/M45_(Stahlhelm)

 Minute 5:48: https://archive.org/details/DieDeutscheWochenschauNr.733

Quote

 

The NVA steel helmet has an eventful history, the beginnings go back to the Third Reich. There the steel helmet used later in the NVA was invented and also patented under the Reich patent no. 706467. It was tried here to manufacture a helmet easier to produce, which has better protection against splinters and bullets by the beveled edges. The straight surfaces at the front of the Model M42 were often penetrated by bullets and splinters. The end of the war did not allow a large series production, the helmet has not come out beyond a pre-series in 1945.

Based on a memorandum from the Army Medical Inspectorate, which pointed to the increasing number of head injuries and other shortcomings of the previous German helmet models M35 and M40, the development of a new steel helmet was approved by the Army Weapons Office in 1942 - bypassing the Ministry of Armaments and Adolf Hitler's ban on new helmet designs.

The work was carried out at the Chemisch-Technische Reichsanstalt by the Institut für Wehrtechnische Werkstoffkunde Berlin (Director: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Fry and Dr. Hänsel). Four models were shortlisted for testing: "A" = a slightly modified helmet 35, "B", "B/II" and "C". The experienced manufacturer of steel helmets, the Eisen- und Hüttenwerke AG Thale/Harz, which had been commissioned with the production of the test samples, also submitted the "Thale proposal", which had been developed as a modification of the model "B" under the direction of the chief engineer Erich Kisan. During firing and troop tests, the two "B" models proved to be the best. The prototype was registered as a patent on December 7, 1943 under the number 706467. The further results were summarized in a memorandum and presented to the Führer's headquarters in the fall of 1944. Despite the positive assessment of the helmets as well as the great savings in material and working time, it refused to introduce a new helmet model - apparently for logistical reasons and for reasons of tradition. Only a few hundred helmets were issued for troop testing. Series production did not take place.

The NVA later took up this design again and produced this helmet from 1956 in series, in the course of time this was revised several times. The later versions had clipped chinstraps which loosened with load. Due to the far protruding sides, soldiers were often stuck on edges of vehicles or trenches, which led to injuries to the spine. Ballistically and in the hearing the NVA steel helmet is until today one of the best, if not even the best! The protective effect has only been surpassed since the introduction of Kevlar helmets.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

 

Reichspatent-706467-Stahlhelm-NVA.jpg

Edited by sawomi
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