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I was mainly checking on whether Rubble was out for CMRT.

So, you know how you click around ...

https://www.battlefront.com/about-us

It looks to me like there are some basic English spelling and grammar errors.

I assume BFC is incorporated in the USA, and most primaries are native speakers of English.

* Thus, this small blurb of text about your most precious enterprise should be perfect.

* Also, in the age of spelling and grammar checking on every telephone, given the 1998 founding ... such errors make it look like the company might still be operating in 1998.

Thanks.

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Here you go. Found a couple of typos in the first two paragraphs. Can't see any other.

"September 2016

Battlefront.com was founded in 1998 to provide high quality, innovative games for people looking for serious wargames.  At the time such games had been all but squeezed out of the marketplace by the crushing forces of retail sales practices.  To woark work around this problem Battlefront unvieled unveiled itself in 1999 as an Internet only company.  It's hard to believe now, but industry veterans and so-called experts said "you're crazy, it will never work".  20 years later Battlefront is here making games and most of them are not.

What follows is a shortened version of the original "Manefesto" "Manifesto" which was posted when Battlefront.com first went live:..."

You're welcome ;)

 

Edited by Malaspina
spelling, of course
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Don't want to seem like a grammar Nazi (or like the other sort of Nazi you come across occasionally on this site) but a mistake I often see on these pages is in the use of its and it's, even from very competent writers. A useful trick I learned is that it's is always short for it is or it has. So if you apply that rule to "it's becoming clear that..." you can see it works perfectly. But if you apply that rule to "there are problems with it's performance..." you can immediately see it doesn't work, and you should instead be using its.

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14 minutes ago, Anson Pelmet said:

 like the other sort of Nazi you come across occasionally on this site

Really?  I haven't seen that but I'm fairly new here.  However, I nearly always play CM as the Germans (not necessarily Nazis), so maybe that puts me in the frame 😉

Edited by Vacilllator
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2 hours ago, Anson Pelmet said:

Don't want to seem like a grammar Nazi (or like the other sort of Nazi you come across occasionally on this site) but a mistake I often see on these pages is in the use of its and it's, even from very competent writers. A useful trick I learned is that it's is always short for it is or it has. So if you apply that rule to "it's becoming clear that..." you can see it works perfectly. But if you apply that rule to "there are problems with it's performance..." you can immediately see it doesn't work, and you should instead be using its.

Exactly. I see well-educated writers making the it's/its mistake very frequently. (The other day I even saw an its'... as in a plural possessive.) I think of the issue in terms of grammatical symmetry, like this:

He's eating his dinner.

She's eating her dinner.

They're eating their dinner.

It's eating its dinner.

Possessive pronouns never have apostrophes. Ever. Instead, apostrophes with pronouns always represent a contraction. 

 

 

 

Edited by sttp
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"Really?  I haven't seen that but I'm fairly new here.  However, I nearly always play CM as the Germans (not necessarily Nazis), so maybe that puts me in the frame 😉"

I mostly play as the Germans too, cos it's more fun to play with cool equipment against superior numbers (although I recall a quote attributed to Stalin along the lines that "Quantity has a quality all of its own"), and I don't think that puts me or you in the frame of the Nazis I was referring to. I'm thinking of a tiny number of contributors who've said that because the Allies committed some atrocities that made them morally equivalent to Nazi Germany - but let's not open that can of worms here!

 

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When I was a lot younger than I am now, I found a can of worms at the side of a lovely river in Scotland (probably the Tummel or the Tay).  Not really thinking about it, I opened the said can.  Immediately I had a cloud of presumably very hungry flies in my face.  Lucky flies I suppose, not so lucky me. 

Is that where the expression comes from?

Edited by Vacilllator
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Principles or principals?

In principle I think the principals of a firm should explain their game design principles.

------

I usually ost (=post) drunk, so that's my excuse (error picked up just in time) :)

---

A very short book called "Elements of Style" by Strunk and White may help the confused.

 

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7 minutes ago, Anson Pelmet said:

"In principle I think the principals of a firm should explain their game design principles."

Exactly! A clever way to remember the correct use of those words.

Slightly convoluted in execution but correct.

Anyway, I was wondering in a less busy moment why we always say 'Are you okay?' instead of 'Is you okay?'.  Sounds a bit London admittedly, which I'm not.  But @Anson Pelmet it's your fault that I'm even thinking about it 😁.

 

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Okay, so I was not the most competent writer of English to point out errors.  I don't deny it.

I grew up NY, USA, and a very important debate was taking place in schools while I was a kid.

* Penmanship (before computers)

*  English spelling/grammar

I will skip the first, but here is the second:

(A)  English is the national language and any student presented answer should be written in perfect English or be penalized in score.

OR

(B)  Perfect English is for English and Literature class ... in science and any subjects as long you demonstrated you knew the answer you receive 100%.

Position B would win.  I don't know why.  I have studied linguistics and the history of English.  I don't know if B is correct, but languages are far more a moving target than most people realize.

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