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Well.. all I know is my reply which you quoted was tongue in cheek.. can't say the same for yours.  I for one feel extremely lucky that the CMx2 series exists in as many forms as it does. B

So the British Ministry of Defense is subsidizing me playing w my toy soliders & tanks?  And all I have to do for this is wait a little longer for the new release?  I am considering this a win for

The only thing worse than 1940s Nazis is a present day Nazi. One might argue the populace 80 years ago were naïf about just what sort of monsters they were supporting. You can't make that argument now

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I was reading a translation of a 1970 Russia tactics book the other day and it discussed how the width covered by a battalion shifted over the course of the war. The question is, will I be able to locate that reference?

... Ah! Not only did I find the book, the relevant passage was fortuitously bookmarked!

Quote

In August 1942 the 88th Rifle division of the Western Front was attacking across a front of 2.6km. It received as reinforcements a tank brigade (35 tanks), two artillery regiments, and a mortar regiment. With organic and attached means, it could set up the following densities per kilometer of front: 3.5 rifle battalions, 13 tanks, and 84 guns and mortars. the depth of its combined mission was 7.5km.

The 94th Guard Rifle Division, attacking... ...in January 1945 across a front of two kilometers, received as reinforcements an artillery and motor brigade, two tank regiments (60 tanks), and a sapper battalion. The density of men and materiel per kilometer of front was 4.5 rifle battalions, 30 tanks, 240 guns and mortars, and the depth of the combat mission was 18km.

I think that was numbers for a major offensive (the book is literally called 'The Offensive'). Jan'45 would be the Vistula-Oder offensive, I'd guess. Would august 42 be the battle of Stalingrad? I cannot fathom placing 4 battalions and 30 tanks on a 1km wide CM map

Edited by MikeyD
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24 minutes ago, MikeyD said:

I was reading a translation of a 1970 Russia tactics book the other day and it discussed how the width covered by a battalion shifted over the course of the war. The question is, will I be able to locate that reference?

... Ah! Not only did I find the book, the relevant passage was fortuitously bookmarked!

I think that was numbers for a major offensive (the book is literally called 'The Offensive'). Jan'45 would be the Vistula-Oder offensive, I'd guess. Would august 42 be the battle of Stalingrad? I cannot fathom placing 4 battalions and 30 tanks on a 1km wide CM map

August 42 might be Kharkov which just preceded the German attack towards Stalingrad IIRC or perhaps something around Moscow.

Edited by ASL Veteran
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I did some Google researching. I can't find anything on 94th Guards Rifle but in the book they were said to be out of the Vistula bridgehead at Magunshev (Magnuszew). So that is the Vistula Oder offensive that crushed German defenses like a bug. 88th rifle division in '42 would have been a newly formed force based around the Moscow military zone that participated in the liberation of Smolensk around that time. I do like Google sometimes.

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3 hours ago, MikeyD said:

I was reading a translation of a 1970 Russia tactics book the other day and it discussed how the width covered by a battalion shifted over the course of the war. The question is, will I be able to locate that reference?

... Ah! Not only did I find the book, the relevant passage was fortuitously bookmarked!

I think that was numbers for a major offensive (the book is literally called 'The Offensive'). Jan'45 would be the Vistula-Oder offensive, I'd guess. Would august 42 be the battle of Stalingrad? I cannot fathom placing 4 battalions and 30 tanks on a 1km wide CM map

So what book was this and is it online?

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The title on the jacket is "The Offensive (A Soviet View)" with the line 'Soviet Military Thought' running along the bottom.  On the inside page it says A.A. Sidorenko, Moscow 1970.

Beneath that is the line "Translated and published under the auspices of the United States Air Force'. My book is ancient, perhaps going back to 1974.

I just Googled the author, name and 'ebook' and got this link, with the word 'FREE' appended to it. ^_^

https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Offensive_a_Soviet_View.html?id=x-8IAQAAIAAJ

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9 hours ago, mirekm61 said:

Russian books from the 1970s contained a great deal of propaganda and few facts

Quote: 'Armies belonging to the agressive NATO alliance devote much attention to night operations, the defense in particular...' 🙂

 

 

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Soviet rifle division in offensive:

Winter 41/Winter 42  - 7...14 km (mostly in one echelone)

Autumn 42 - 4..5 km

Summer 43 - 2...2,5 km (two or even three echelones)

44-45 - 1,5 - 2 km

 

Soviet rifle division in defense: 6...14 km

But, of course all depended from current tasks and situation

Edited by Haiduk
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On 7/28/2020 at 11:35 PM, MikeyD said:

I think that was numbers for a major offensive (the book is literally called 'The Offensive'). Jan'45 would be the Vistula-Oder offensive, I'd guess. Would august 42 be the battle of Stalingrad? I cannot fathom placing 4 battalions and 30 tanks on a 1km wide CM map

Battalions were deeply echeloned. If division attacks in 2,5km front, in 1-st line are 4 rifle battalions (each on 750m front), in 2-nd line 2 rifle battalions, then goes 3-rd regiment. Divisions had objectives deep in the rear and had to be deeply echeloned to achieve this objectives. 

During Vistula-Oder offensive each division transferred 1 battalion to "special echelone", to capture German positions by surprise, during pause in artillery preparation. So this "special echelone" battalions attacked on division frontage, 2-2,5 km (followed by other battalions, in usual formation).

Edited by DMS
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On 7/29/2020 at 12:42 AM, MikeyD said:

. I can't find anything on 94th Guards Rifle but in the book they were said to be out of the Vistula bridgehead at Magunshev (Magnuszew). So that is the Vistula Oder offensive that crushed German defenses like a bug.

I found division's journal: https://pamyat-naroda.ru/documents/view/?id=130019938

On page 4 is table with personell numbers. Division had 7500 men. (Note that it was reinforced division, that was moved from reserve.)  That's why so narrow front. On 1.2.45 division had 6100 men. Page 25 - maps.

 

Edited by DMS
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  • 3 months later...
On 7/30/2020 at 2:57 PM, DMS said:

I found division's journal: https://pamyat-naroda.ru/documents/view/?id=130019938

On page 4 is table with personell numbers. Division had 7500 men. (Note that it was reinforced division, that was moved from reserve.)  That's why so narrow front. On 1.2.45 division had 6100 men. Page 25 - maps.

 

The Soviets usually forced anyone into service they could lay their hands on, so their units were (much) stronger than reported.

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