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Multicam 3rd Infantry Division


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8 hours ago, IICptMillerII said:

Possibly. I can’t commit to anything at the moment due to a very erratic schedule. I’ll certainly remember 10th Mountain next time I get a chance to do some modding though. 

No worries, my pixeltruppen will continue to do their jobs patrolling for IEDs in the Triangle of Death, securing the local marketplace, engaging in street battles with insurgents... while they wait for freakin DoD to send them their damn unit patches.. :D  

 

 

 

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Edited by sburke
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@Mord for simplicity sake, here is a quick breakdown of the modern modular brigade structure. There are 3 types of brigades. Infantry Brigade Combat Team (IBCT) Stryker Brigade Combat Team (SBCT)

Thanks for the positive feedback everyone! You're in luck, I have an 82nd skin nearly ready to go. I'll add 2ID to the list as well. Might as well throw in 1st Cav at this point too. 

Yeah I can show the dorito chip some love as well. Right now I'm planning on doing: 2nd Infantry Division 4th Infantry Division 1st Cavalry Division 101st Airborne (Air

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25 minutes ago, IICptMillerII said:

Great pictures btw!

It is a greatly expanded version of George MC's Circle the Wagons map. I started the map for the 10th, but hell the 4th, 101st and Marines were all around there and likely others as well.  Technically I should be using the 4th ID but I just happened to be looking at reviews of None Left Behind- the 10th Mt in the Valley of Death.  What started me though was a story in the Military History Institute publication Tip of the Spear (free by the way- https://history.army.mil/html/books/iraq/TotS/index.html).  I have to quote the beginning as it makes for a great opening scenario. 

 

Musayyib, a majority Shi’ite city of about two hundred thousand located sixty kilometers south of Baghdad, reflected many of the divisive issues that arose in Iraq after the toppling of Saddam Hussein’s regime. On Saturday evening, 17 July 2005, al-Qaeda in Iraq targeted the town as part of a regional wave of suicide attacks. A propane tanker truck exploded in a fireball just as shoppers crowded a marketplace and worshippers departed an adjacent Shi’ite mosque. A hundred civilians perished in the inferno, making it one of the deadliest terrorist operations up to that point in the conflict. Angry crowds blamed local authorities for not doing enough to prevent the horrific attack, while national legislators criticized the prime minister for repeated failures by Iraqi security forces.

Moqtada al-Sadr ordered his Mahdi militia to begin patrolling neighborhoods, calculating that he would garner popular support by doing so. The Baghdad government responded to the bombing by replacing the city’s chief of police with Col. Ahmed Mijwal, a Shi’ite.  The colonel would prove to be a corrupt official who did little to soothe tensions between the religious sects. He was soon competing with Sadr’s militia for money and influence. The two sides eventually clashed over the receipts from the gas station located in Tahir, a suburb of Musayyib. The urban area straddled the Euphrates, with Tahir on the western bank and Musayyib across a bridge to the east. Mijwal had assigned Mohammed Jassim, a Sunni who served with him in Hussein’s army, to collect a share of the money at the end of each day. The militia, which was also extorting money and free gasoline from the station’s owner, apparently was incensed at a Sunni interfering with a major source of revenue.

On the morning of 22 July 2006, the Mahdi militia snatched Jassim from the gas station. The kidnappers encountered a police patrol as they drove back to the mosque in Musayyib that served as their headquarters. The gunmen disarmed the Iraqi police and disabled their patrol vehicle by firing several rounds into the engine. Learning of the incident, an incensed Colonel Mijwal stormed over to the mosque to confront the militia leaders.  After trading heated comments for a few minutes, Mijwal reportedly blurted out: “If you mess with me, I’ll have the Americans bring this mosque down on your head!”

His words were more prophetic than he knew. Just then a patrol from Company D, 1st Battalion, 67th Armor, 4th Infantry Division, led by 2d Lt. C. Ryan Kelley, was en route to Tahir to teach Iraqi police officers the finer points of manning a roadside checkpoint. As the American patrol neared its destination, Sgt. Stanley R. Sneathen overheard shots coming from the east. Kelley decided to detour to investigate...….

and away we go  It is just begging for a scenario probably named Kelley's Heroes, but then we'd have to have a bank.

 

 

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