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FEEDBACK ON THE DEMO: The demo is absolutely great! I'm enjoying it so much! Finished the Alamo scenario yesterday and now playing the marines landing on the beach: Flashes and tracers blitz

Steve, Casio et.al, Been a few too many years since I was active on the boards or behind the scenes but there's pretty much not a day goes by that I don't make a PBEM move with my ol' mate across

Fulga Gap!

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On October 20, 2018 at 7:49 AM, Ultradave said:

Mortars can be fired quite quickly and are very high angle weapons, so after calling "Check Fire" there can be a fairly large number of rounds already in the air that have yet to impact. Time of flight can be up to 50 seconds or so depending on the range and the size of the mortar.

My 60mm motar section used to practice "final protective fire" (FPF) by dropping 30 rounds simultaneously down three tubes in one minute at full increment charge (each round has charge increments on the four fins to allow varying the range by removing increments). That meant we had a total of 90 rounds in the air before the first one hit! The tubes would be so hot that the sealant in the base cap would  start to boil out. An FPF was used under emergency conditions when the SHTF and the need for defense out weighed the risks of the rounds walking back to the our lines.

On October 20, 2018 at 7:49 AM, Ultradave said:

Real life example from the 82d Abn. As a FIST Chief we were calling mortars danger close, and the rounds were gradually walking back towards us. Called "Check Fire" and got the reply "Rounds Complete".  Which meant exactly as I described - 20 or so rounds still to impact. We fell back. What had happened was the mortar baseplates were grinding into soft ground causing the tubes to elevate slightly (and therefore bringing the rounds closer). The crew hadn't noticed the change, which was pretty slight - but with close rounds, it made a BIG difference to us up front.

This was always a real concern, even with 60mm mortars. My gunners would check their sights every few rounds to make sure the baseplate wasn't sinking (on soft surfaces) or bouncing (on hard surfaces). Sometimes we'd go so far as to place the baseplate on flak jackets to lessen the sinking or bouncing.

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11 hours ago, JeffPreston said:

Sorry - I can't see how to edit my post. I see an edit button now, but perhaps that is only if no-one has read the post?

I have a correction to a typo...

"...is this a conceivable amount of time?"

 

Yes, depending on the type of support fire. For example, if the spotter, or anyone on the line, calls a check fire, the radio request might need to be relayed through company or battalion, then to the firing unit, then to the gun crew. It isn't instantaneous as it sometimes seems in the game. A gun team never receives a fire mission directly. It is always through a number of relays.

Edited by Vet 0369
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12 hours ago, JeffPreston said:

Sorry - I can't see how to edit my post. I see an edit button now, but perhaps that is only if no-one has read the post?

I have a correction to a typo...

"...is this a conceivable amount of time?"

 

^^^  What he said. 🙂  Even if an FO in direct contact with the company mortars, the radio operator receives check fire, anounces it, the section leader then tells the mortar crews check fire.  In that several, maybe 5 seconds.....  fooomp, fooomp, fooomp, check firing.

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Thanks again for the information!

In my two examples (where the rounds kept coming in for as much as 1 minute 52 seconds after requesting check fire) there was no acknowledgement from the mortar folks of the FO having requested fire to be checked - is this what would really happen? 

I'm just  trying to determine if there was a problem (the report of which may help the developers) with the program or if all is well.

If all the rounds were already in the air then would the artillery unit say nothing at all if "check fire" was requested?

Even if all the rounds were not in the air and...

>> " the radio operator receives check fire, anounces it, the section leader then tells the mortar crews check fire

...then would the FO not finally have got an acknowledgement back?

 

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Well, in the case I described I got a "rounds complete"  No acknowledgement of the check fire, but a message that firing has stopped but there are still rounds to impact.

In my day it was all radio - none of the 'newer' digital equipment. The radio operators would always repeat back the call for fire, and the adjustment commands. The calls by the battery of splash, rounds complete, etc, we would not acknowledge to reduce radio traffic to the minimum. Repeating the orders is important enough that it was done all the time to avoid errors. Informational transmission might get a mike key in return at most.

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4 hours ago, Heinrich505 said:

Scenario A Day at the Beach, and what do we find?  Captain S. Burke, in command, but what is he looking at?  The enemy is in the other direction.  Is he checking out some beach bunnies that got confused and ended up on this slab of coastline?  "Hey, Captain, over this way."   

Lerg9hq7 o

 

yep seen the AI doing this alot. I had to manually face them towards the enemy, like a claymore mine.

Edited by 71st_Mastiff
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On ‎10‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 8:46 PM, Lethaface said:

Have him lead the charge! 😋

Captains NEVER lead the charge. That's what they have Lt. platoon commanders for. Losing a Lt. is no big deal. That's why we have platoon sergeants!

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On ‎10‎/‎30‎/‎2018 at 12:02 AM, 71st_Mastiff said:

yep seen the AI doing this alot. I had to manually face them towards the enemy, like a claymore mine.

Yeah, but if the enemy has good sappers, they can belly up to the claymore, pick it up, and turn it around on you. In Vietnam, Marines would attach a tripwire from the claymore to a grenade because of that. At the beginning, they used frags, but too many Marines were wounded or killed recovering the claymores of Marines who had been killed or wounded, so they used illumination grenades instead.

Edited by Vet 0369
Fat fingers.
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I find this the most impossibly difficult game to play.  Don't get me wrong, I love it!  But trying to breach buildings where the enemy lay in wait leads to certain death every time. Entire squads get wiped out.  I've reloaded about a dozen times and with a dozen different strategies but every time my guys get slaughtered. What am I doing wrong?   

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18 minutes ago, Andy_101 said:

I find this the most impossibly difficult game to play.  Don't get me wrong, I love it!  But trying to breach buildings where the enemy lay in wait leads to certain death every time. Entire squads get wiped out.  I've reloaded about a dozen times and with a dozen different strategies but every time my guys get slaughtered. What am I doing wrong?   

It would be good to have some more detail on where you are struggling, but an initial question - do you actually need to breach/occupy that particular building? Could it be bypassed instead?

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43 minutes ago, Andy_101 said:

I find this the most impossibly difficult game to play.  Don't get me wrong, I love it!  But trying to breach buildings where the enemy lay in wait leads to certain death every time. Entire squads get wiped out.  I've reloaded about a dozen times and with a dozen different strategies but every time my guys get slaughtered. What am I doing wrong?   

Put simply, don't enter buildings occupied by the enemy. If you know the building is occupied, level it with fires first. Don't charge into point blank rifle fire. 

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10 minutes ago, IICptMillerII said:

Put simply, don't enter buildings occupied by the enemy. If you know the building is occupied, level it with fires first. Don't charge into point blank rifle fire. 

Or a building that still has enemies on the far wall.... death trap. Urban combat is simply brutal.  Lots of ammo, demo charges, flanking enemy positions if possible.  Before you enter a room area fire into it. Some of that fire will pass through the opposite wall and suppress or drive off enemy units.   Go slow. 

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13 hours ago, Andy_101 said:

I find this the most impossibly difficult game to play.  Don't get me wrong, I love it!  But trying to breach buildings where the enemy lay in wait leads to certain death every time. Entire squads get wiped out.  I've reloaded about a dozen times and with a dozen different strategies but every time my guys get slaughtered. What am I doing wrong?   

Don't get discouraged.  Unlike nearly all other "wargames" which are easy to learn and allow one to "Rambo" one's way thru, CM has a very steep learning curve.  It takes time to learn, train yourself, and understand how to accomplish objectives.   Hope you are starting play on the easiest level.

 

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