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The CM2 FAQ Thread


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19 hours ago, Erwin said:

Well...  According to what I have read here, (and I did find it hard to believe) there may be mods that actually alter the odds of your guys being hit.  Assuming only one side of a PBEM is using that mod or mod(s) there would be an advantage.  IIRC, one such mod is changes the stance of troops giving buddy aid, or how they lie down or somesuch.  I had always thought that was mere eye candy.  However...   I regret I forget the details of the forum string.  Hopefully, someone else may jump in with a link.

While a mod can alter a few things by changing where the soldier polygons are located this will *NOT* give a lopsided advantage. In a PBEM game one machine calculates the turn results. Mods on that machine could effect the outcome but they will apply to both sides in the same way.

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Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, Erwin said:

IIRC, one such mod is changes the stance of troops giving buddy aid, or how they lie down or somesuch.  I had always thought that was mere eye candy.  However...   I regret I forget the details of the forum string.  Hopefully, someone else may jump in with a link.

Try this:

@RockinHarry's fine work, so he may wish to comment (again 😄).

EDIT: the mod is 'unarmed-tend to casualty' if that's not obvious.  It's in all of my Z folders 👍.

Edited by Vacilllator
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4 hours ago, Vacilllator said:

 

@RockinHarry's fine work, so he may wish to comment (again 😄).

EDIT: the mod is 'unarmed-tend to casualty' if that's not obvious.  It's in all of my Z folders 👍.

erm...no actually. 😁 But nice seeing some the stuff is beeing used by couple of players. 😎 Despite some the doubts on the mod´s ingame effects.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Vergeltungswaffe said:

I use it and I have absolutely 0 doubt that it makes a difference.

Way too many dead medics before. Hardly any now.

I hope so as that is great when playing vs the AI.  A bit controversial if playing H2H unless both players have the same mod(s).

Edited by Erwin
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On 7/14/2020 at 2:35 AM, Rob2020 said:

Out of curiosity how many people play hot seat games on a regular basis. I do for testing but that is all.

Weekly that's the only way I play a human opponent. PBEM is I am afraid not for us. We have some house rules, and we like to play huge battles. I understand the majority of PBEM players like small scenarios. Some people like to do MODS, some like to make movies they have something for everybody. Besides, I don't have a Dropbox account. 

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3 hours ago, Bulletpoint said:

@RockinHarry One thing I've been thinking about is whether it's actually possible in real life to give buddy aid while lying prone?

Depends on what needs to be done. Obviously you won't be able to do CPR, but other things maybe.

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5 hours ago, Bulletpoint said:

@RockinHarry One thing I've been thinking about is whether it's actually possible in real life to give buddy aid while lying prone?

RL.... don´t really know TBH. Considering in game abstraction level it´s not of real concern I believe. It´s basic first aid measures and not brain surgery so I´d guess most things "should be" possible.

2 hours ago, womble said:

And having the aider prone goes some way to providing an abstraction of dragging the casualty back into cover before administering buddy aid.

something like that I´d guess. As is pulling some ammo, a weapon or binocular from dead bodies.

 

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On 5/20/2021 at 2:00 PM, Vacilllator said:

I'm disappointed to read that cheating in PBEM is not possible.  I was hoping it might explain my dismal results 😁.

Wait a minute! You can't cheat in PBEM 😳??? Uhhh ohhh....  🤭

:D

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16 hours ago, Bulletpoint said:

One thing I've been thinking about is whether it's actually possible in real life to give buddy aid while lying prone?

Not really - that, and despite me repeatedly mentioning here that in my 4 years of active duty as a combat medic we never, ever trained once to treat casualties while prone, there are certain members here who continue to ignore that. 

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2 hours ago, LukeFF said:

Not really - that, and despite me repeatedly mentioning here that in my 4 years of active duty as a combat medic we never, ever trained once to treat casualties while prone, there are certain members here who continue to ignore that. 

To pile on here - the drills we were taught in pre-deployment training involved ensuring the safety of yourself and the casualty at all times.  The IA drill; therefore, was to win the firefight first and then either extract the casualty to a safe place or attend to the casualty at the point of wounding rather than urinate about trying to treat someone from the prone position, which as LukeFF has pointed out is not something that medics are trained to do and from my less expert military experience is almost impossible.  If none of you have tried moving dead weight then try it and remember that an injured inert soldier will be a lot heavier and more difficult to move than most people when you take into account the equipment they'll be carrying and, in the modern era, the body armour they will be wearing.

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Maybe it´s more of a theory vs. practice thing in wartime conditions. I at least found this excerpt very interesting, if not revealing.

Infantry Combat Medics in Europe, 1944–45 (Tracy Shilcutt)

Chapter 3, Combat Reality

page 50

Doc, as his unit called him, pressed into the earth as he crawled toward a wounded rifleman. German bullets slashed overhead in the darkening battleground and when he finally reached his buddy he knew he would have to work blindly as snipers fired at any light. His initial assessment indicated that he was dealing with a chest wound. So without benefit of sight, Private T. William Bossidy thrust grimy hands inside his comrade’s shirt, following the sticky trail of welling blood to the torn cavity. He could do no more than sprinkle sulfa powder in the wound and staunch the flow of blood before moving on to help other casualties. Doc Bossidy had in fact no education in the medical arts; his journey to the front as a replacement aid man for the 2d Division reflects the often disjointed yet pragmatic ways in which the Army cared for its combat wounded. His schooling in the mysteries of Spam and eggs at Camp Pickett provided absurd preparation for the lifesaving duties facing him as a company aid man.

As the struggle for Europe intensified, the flood of casualties demanded additional front line medical personnel. In response, the Army pulled Bossidy and others like him from kitchens and typewriters, tasking them first with litter bearer’s work. But as the American forces pushed toward the Siegfried Line attrition among company aid men forced the erstwhile cooks and clerks to move beyond transporting the wounded to treating their injured and dying comrades. Following cursory field explanations of bandaging and morphine injections, Bossidy donned the brassards of a front line company aid man. As an initial caregiver, his new duties seemed deceptively simplistic: control bleeding, minimize shock, manage pain. But as he tended to his fellow soldiers he realized how external forces profoundly complicated his seemingly straightforward job. Bossidy’s story, while distinctive in its details, reflects in its whole the chaotic world of each company aid man as he confronted his own unique circumstances. As the first medical contact for the wounded, aid men worked independently of the BAS medical soldiers, traveling with and living among the infantry platoons. Whether trained in the United States or, as in Bossidy’s case, simply initiated on the field, company aid men in European campaigns learned that Army doctrine and training scarcely prepared them for the horrific realities of war. Successful medics rapidly adapted to combat conditions, insuring their own survival as well as that of their comrades. Learning on the go and under fire, they abandoned or radically modified prescribed medical techniques, discovered ways to utilize the changing terrains for their own protection and for the safety of the wounded, and coped with unanticipated long-term problems. Endowed with a spirit of pragmatism, Doc Bossidy, and the thousands of “Docs” like him, performed their crucial role in the crusade to liberate Europe despite the inadequate, or even absent, training.

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You might want to talk with my brother (VN combat vet), buddy (VN Dust Off medic), or my sister’s former boyfriend (VN combat vet—Bronze Star for pulling two wounded buddies out of line of fire). It’s possible, but obviously will only be the most basic aid, in only the most necessary/dire conditions, and not trained for nor recommended.  A suboptimal option for certain. But considering the amount of abstraction needed in this game in general, not only including treating wounds and weapon and ammo retrieval, I don’t have any problem using Rockin Harry’s mod.

PS: I wouldn’t have bothered posting this, but it’s Memorial Day and I wanted to acknowledge their Vietnam service in this small way, plus they all had experience with treating or otherwise helping wounded under fire). 

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