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Rundstedt Sends His Best - a CMFB Comic AAR


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I’m the author of these. Thanks for the compliments!  If you’re looking at these on a phone you will miss fine details. I’ve urged readers in the past to click the images for 2000px resolution to see

That comic is really good and well made. This reminds me of the comics about the second world war me and my brothers read when we were kids in which the Allies always were heroes and the Germans alway

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Looks like your forward force has been annihilated without making much of an impression on the Germans... What's the plan now? Waiting for him to advance and pounce those halftracks with your armor?

Now that his men have really tired trigger fingers I can relax and wait - he will need to rest them before he comes to me and time is running out! ;) Victory through index finger lactic acidosis! 

In case that does not work, he will have to cross a lot of open ground. That will be dangerous for his soft units and light armour. I'm more worried about his tanks and flanking them. 

 

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Now that his men have really tired trigger fingers I can relax and wait - he will need to rest them before he comes to me and time is running out! ;) Victory through index finger lactic acidosis! 

In case that does not work, he will have to cross a lot of open ground. That will be dangerous for his soft units and light armour. I'm more worried about his tanks and flanking them. 

 

Okay, I had no idea he had real AFV in his OOB... I just hope they're not heavies otherwise it is going to get more grim :)

 

BTW I must say that the representation in a comic book form works very well when it comes to understand the flow of the action - timing is clear from the order in which vignettes are presented. Besides the doctoring of colours etc. Here's as well a LOT of editing work... How long does it take you to do an average panel?

Edited by BletchleyGeek
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:o Oh wow, what an utter anihilation!

...

and what a great ww2 story telling medium are CM and cooming book art style!

 

The last scene is better then what you can see in movies, so chilling...

Thank you - CM is great for this stuff. I have more stories to tell than you'd have patience to read. :D

so, that last scene:

image.thumb.jpeg.db43de0e7107554f6d7177c

 

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Okay, I had no idea he had real AFV in his OOB... I just hope they're not heavies otherwise it is going to get more grim :)

 

BTW I must say that the representation in a comic book form works very well when it comes to understand the flow of the action - timing is clear from the order in which vignettes are presented. Besides the doctoring of colours etc. Here's as well a LOT of editing work... How long does it take you to do an average panel?

I don't have a clue what he has, to be honest. Other than that this is a Beta CAAR, so some form of demonstration of handy nick-knacks available to both sides will be...er...field-tested. ;)

I'm really delighted that you told me the flow is understandable. It's one of my big worries: balancing reasonable length (and avoiding too much detail) and clarity. Not to mention, I want these to be visually appealing, and above all, fun for the reader.

So yes, there is a lot of work involved. What you need to understand is that while it may take only a couple of hours to do each panel itself, the dozens of screenshots I go through to find the right one, to compose a story to tell, to find the shots that will tell that story most effectively, to check for consistency of design, colour, etc. Finally, I need to be able to tell something worth reading, or it's just a collection of screenshots to peruse. I need to give some characters personality, etc. There is a lead up time too, in that each comic has a unique colour scheme that I am trying to tie to national identity. I have to figure out these things before I start, and often as I work I see that something isn't achieving one or more objectives - colours clash, it's hard on the eyes, etc, and I have to redo a half dozen panels before I can settle on a design. 

All told, when you put this together, I approximated that 3 panels is about an 8 hour day's work. Sometimes more, sometimes less, but this would be the average. 

Thank you for your question, it's nice someone considers the effort. :)

 

Edited by Bud_B
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so, that last scene:

So good to see another Tintin fan here ( as well as being an Asterix fan ).

Is that the scene just after Wolff cuts the wires and the takeoff fails ? Looks like it, but it's been about 20 years since I read that one.
Herge. Respect.

Edited by Baneman
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So good to see another Tintin fan here ( as well as being an Asterix fan ).

Is that the scene just after Wolff cuts the wires and the takeoff fails ? Looks like it, but it's been about 20 years since I read that one.
Herge. Respect.

Likewise, so happy to see a fellow Tintinologist! :D  Yes, I love Asterix too! 

You have it right...the rocket tried to take off leaving everyone behind and Wolff sabotaged the nuclear motor by cutting the wires. 20 years is far too long. I have all the Tintins but Alph-art and Soviets, and re-read them pretty much every year. 

Hergé's style and motifs are something that profoundly informed how I approach my own comics. My copies of Tintin were of course translated to English - with British expressions and pop culture references that you don't see any more, like "came a cropper" "gaol" "drives like Jack Brabham" "done for" "puts paid" and so on...

I raise a pint to you, Sir. ;)

 

 

Edited by Bud_B
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Likewise, so happy to see a fellow Tintinologist! :D  Yes, I love Asterix too! 

You have it right...the rocket tried to take off leaving everyone behind and Wolff sabotaged the nuclear motor by cutting the wires. 20 years is far too long. I have all the Tintins but Alph-art and Soviets, and re-read them pretty much every year. 

Hergé's style and motifs are something that profoundly informed how I approach my own comics. My copies of Tintin were of course translated to English - with British expressions and pop culture references that you don't see any more, like "came a cropper" "gaol" "drives like Jack Brabham" "done for" "puts paid" and so on...

I raise a pint to you, Sir. ;)

 

 

Hehe, I still use "drives like Jack Brabham" here and they have forgotten it themselves in the UK :o :(

I had all the Tintins, but left them with a friend when I moved to the UK. Sadly, they were burgled before I could retrieve them and all was lost :angry:
But since I read them so assiduously in my youth, I can still pretty much quote them verbatim. :lol:

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Hehe, I still use "drives like Jack Brabham" here and they have forgotten it themselves in the UK :o :(

I had all the Tintins, but left them with a friend when I moved to the UK. Sadly, they were burgled before I could retrieve them and all was lost :angry:
But since I read them so assiduously in my youth, I can still pretty much quote them verbatim. :lol:

I still use "came a cropper" myself! ;)

Pity about losing them like that - they are re-publishing them in collections of 3-4 books a time in one hardbound, reasonably priced. :)

 

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