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Photogrammar : 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945


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Here's a new website that could interest some of you :

http://photogrammar.yale.edu/

"Photogrammar is a web-based platform for organizing, searching, and visualizing the 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945 created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI)."

The treemap tool is especially interesting for you, grunts :

http://photogrammar.yale.edu/labs/treemap/

Click on "War" (blue rectangle on bottom + right), then select subcategories (for example : "Special training functions", then "Infantry") until you reach the digitized photos.

Look at this one :

http://photogrammar.yale.edu/records/index.php?record=oem2002000609/PP

"Corporal French L. Vineyard and squad standing at attention. All the men are members of Company M, 12th Infantry. Corporal Vineyard is wearing the new "pot type" of helmet. The other members of the squad are wearing the old or "basin type" of helmet. Arlington Cantonment, Arlington, Virginia"

Priceless, don't you think ?

Enjoy !

Cheers,

JH

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This is great, but my immediate reaction was what connects "Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information"? :)

If you're interested in WW2 photography then I can also recommend Finnish army photograph archive at http://sa-kuva.fi/

It has 160,000 photographs from 1939 to 1945 and also army report reels.

Mmfer07.jpg

The photo descriptions are in Finnish so you may have to use translation software to fully utilize it.

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Here's a new website that could interest some of you :

http://photogrammar.yale.edu/

"Photogrammar is a web-based platform for organizing, searching, and visualizing the 170,000 photographs from 1935 to 1945 created by the United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI)."

The treemap tool is especially interesting for you, grunts :

http://photogrammar.yale.edu/labs/treemap/

Click on "War" (blue rectangle on bottom + right), then select subcategories (for example : "Special training functions", then "Infantry") until you reach the digitized photos.

Look at this one :

http://photogrammar.yale.edu/records/index.php?record=oem2002000609/PP

"Corporal French L. Vineyard and squad standing at attention. All the men are members of Company M, 12th Infantry. Corporal Vineyard is wearing the new "pot type" of helmet. The other members of the squad are wearing the old or "basin type" of helmet. Arlington Cantonment, Arlington, Virginia"

Priceless, don't you think ?

Enjoy !

Cheers,

JH

The progressive New Deal Programs of the 1930's live on. I wonder how much American taxpayer money went into the creation of this archive. Not entirely priceless.

Is it money well spent? Maybe, but the Government doesn't care. it's not their money.

Still, it probably contains things that are of interest to folks on these Forums.

[/rant]

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Well, those photos belong to the taxpayer. Putting them online and allowing everybody to browse them is the very purpose of librarians (and archivists) ;-) I find this collection invaluable because it depicts US society in the 1930's and beginning of the 1940's. Just have a look at the interactive map to find pictures taken near the place you live. For me, your money has been well spent, no doubt about that ;-)

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This is great, but my immediate reaction was what connects "Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information"? :)

If you're interested in WW2 photography then I can also recommend Finnish army photograph archive at http://sa-kuva.fi/

It has 160,000 photographs from 1939 to 1945 and also army report reels.

Mmfer07.jpg

The photo descriptions are in Finnish so you may have to use translation software to fully utilize it.

Seriously, how did this happen?

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Actually since you can see the engine is belching a thick cloud of smoke from the rear and the tracks appear a little blurry, I think the photo has been snapped right on the right moment. The tank must have just jumped across.

Good catch. BTW, my thought on seeing the pic was that I would not want to stand as close as that bunch of guys in the bottom of the picture. It is entirely too easy to imagine the driver missing his aim and driving off the side with an attendant fall and roll. I for one would not want to end my army career crushed under a fallen tank.

:eek:

Michael

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And finally a word of warning for people moaning about putting old pictures online with taxpayers' money :

8e00143v.jpg

This is what you get when you mess with United States Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) :-)

(Original caption : Fort McPherson, Georgia. Left to right: Private First Class Sheldon Ehrlich, Private Edward Tevault, and Private Melvin Kearney practicing a "come along" hold. 1942)

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Molotov cocktail throwing drills in the US army, wot ????

Is this for real?

Incendiary bottle can be a simple ad hoc anti-tank weapon created from ingredients readily available (think of the sticky bombs in Saving Private Ryan but for reals). In the eastern Europe armies used industrially manufactured molotov coctails. The types I have seen are ignited either by storm matches tied on the surface and lit prior to throwing or an ampule inside the bottle containing chemicals that will light the fuel when the bottle is broken. The bottle in the above photo seems to be wrapped in fabric that I guess would have been soaked in fuel and lit so definitely not industrially made. The bandage looks rather clumpy though so I'm not sure what's with that?

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Without any doubt, one of the ugliest tanks ever designed ;-)

But a classic '30s design. Pretty nearly obsolete by the time it saw action though. Anybody know how many were still in frontline service by the end of the Tunisian campaign? Of course the modified chassis continued in service in a variety of roles, particularly as the basis for the M7 Priest.

Michael

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