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LukeFF - and you continue trying to be pedantic, and only succeed in being wrong. The K98 kurz is a K98, just as an M-1A SOCOM is an M-1A, and either is entirely correctly so designated. Sub model designations are completely optional minutae which can be included for specificity if there is any fear of confusion or the distinction is especially relevant in the context, but only then. You also do not need to give the specific factory or the specific year a given rifle was made to designate it correctly.

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Oddball - a scoped K98 is made out of an accurate K98 and a scope (with mount, naturally, which is a simple bit of metal). It is not like the scope is made with the rifle. You get to pick which rifle you use the scope with. The G43 may be scarce, the K98s are not, and the expense of the scope (and a trained person, to be sure) is the limiter on how many scoped rifles you get to field.

Actually, no.

First off, the sniper variants of the Kar98k were picked out at the factory, not in the field.

And secondly, it wasn't as easy as just mounting a scope on it.

It actually required a skilled armourer to modify it to accept the scope mounting (which was different with different models of scope).

This is not something that was done in the field or even in the rear echelons.

So again, it is not up to the individual what rifle he gets when it comes to scoped versions.

On the flipside tho, the G43 came equipped to take a scope without any modifications, so if the G43 that a sniper had got damaged somehow, he could actually just use any 'ol G43 lying around without much work at all.

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Captain Shore would have argued that Germany had very few snipers but many sharpshooters. Snipers add the skills of stalking and scouting to sharpshooting.

Just sayin'. :-)

The telescope sight mounted on this rifle, although similar in many ways to the normal German sniper rifle 'scope, is inferior in others, and altogether the composite job is suspect from the point of view of utility and service.

To anyone who knows the sniper ropes as they should be known it is almost sacrilegious to talk of an automatic sniper rifle!... ... No - the ideal for the sniper remains the selected hand operated rifle, firing the one true shot which counts for everything - the killer!
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Yeah, but first thought: 2nd guy from the right... is he wearing iPod earplugs?

Nah, lanyard for his pistol. Some guys did that to ensure that if they dropped the pistol they could pull it back quickly. You saw that in just about all armies, but I think the vast majority of pistol-armed soldiers just saw it as a quick way to throttle yourself and eschewed the practice.

Michael

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I thought it was a MP-41 for a second till I looked closer at the barrel. Must of been a leftover from the HG divisions time in Italy.

Actually, no. (Or well, maybe, but not necessarily) The Italian weapons industry was concentrated in the north around Milan and was taken over by the Germans. The Germans kept producing the Beretta MAB38/42 as the MP378(i) and issued them to their troops in big numbers. In 1945 the industrial outpit of Berettas was higher than MP40s! Two years ago I visited the Ardennes and Hurtgen Forest areas. Both the Vossenack and Malmedy museums have Beretta smgs on display, including a mud find from the Hurtgen forest. In my opinion Battlefront could well include this weapon in future modules, to mix up German infantry options a bit.

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Actually, no. (Or well, maybe, but not necessarily) The Italian weapons industry was concentrated in the north around Milan and was taken over by the Germans. The Germans kept producing the Beretta MAB38/42 as the MP378(i) and issued them to their troops in big numbers. In 1945 the industrial outpit of Berettas was higher than MP40s! Two years ago I visited the Ardennes and Hurtgen Forest areas. Both the Vossenack and Malmedy museums have Beretta smgs on display, including a mud find from the Hurtgen forest. In my opinion Battlefront could well include this weapon in future modules, to mix up German infantry options a bit.

Wow thanks for the info, I figured most of the photos I had seen of Germans with the modelo 38 could be attested to the disarmament of the Italians.

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Nah, lanyard for his pistol. Some guys did that to ensure that if they dropped the pistol they could pull it back quickly. You saw that in just about all armies, but I think the vast majority of pistol-armed soldiers just saw it as a quick way to throttle yourself and eschewed the practice.

Michael

Yes... I was joking.

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The Italian smg ingame is a different type, the Beretta MAB 38 (as opposed to the MAB 38/42). It was also used by the Germans, although I don't think they produced it.

Fallschirmjäger in Normandy with the older Beretta model:

FJ_MP38

Infantryman in Normandy:

Bundesarchiv+Bild+101I-680-8257-16%23

The guy at the bottom is in the original force specific background mod. He appears to be wearing spurs...

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I have (or at least used to have) a book on German infantry weapons. There was a page devoted to the Beretta that mentioned that the weapon was very popular and was issued mainly to security troops and other second line forces. I expect you would have found a lot of them in the Balkans where the Germans served with the Italians, and took over their weaponry after the Italian armistice.

Michael

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The original version of this SMG, with a 12 inch barrel (vs 10 inch for the MP40) and a full wooden stock, would have been clearly superior to all but the Russian PPsH and maybe the Finnish Suomi, for range and accuracy. The later versions (42-44 designs) cut the barrel down to 8 inches and the overall finish and quality level dropped as well (to make production easier). On the plus side, those modifications did cut the weight substantially, from about 9 lbs to about 7 lbs.

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LukeFF - and you continue trying to be pedantic, and only succeed in being wrong. The K98 kurz is a K98, just as an M-1A SOCOM is an M-1A, and either is entirely correctly so designated.

No, it's only you that is succeeding in being wrong here, as apparently you have no problem with mixing up terms. The Karabiner 98 was a modification of the Gewehr 98 and pre-dates WWI. The Karabiner 98k was based on the Kar98b, which also was a mod of the Gewehr 98. There were plenty of design differences among these, but ultimately they all point back to the Gewehr 98. That was the base of the design.

Go ahead and amuse with your obtuse reply. I'm sure it'll be good.

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