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Bozowans

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  1. Upvote
    Bozowans got a reaction from Bubba883XL in CM:BN Screenshot Thread #2   
    The Khaki Hordes!
     






  2. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from Anonymous_Jonze in Infantry in buildings just won't die.. (and now they won't run away either..)   
    I agree with this 100%. The way you could just sit back and shoot enemies off of hard cover before was silly. In real life it could take hours just to clear out a single apartment building. 
    I'm reminded of the book The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. He remembered spending much of his time in combat cowering in a terrified, delusional stupor at the bottom of his hole, unable to react or do anything except lie there while the bullets and explosions crashed around outside. He wrote that a lot of his memories of combat were just a blur because of it.
    Green or conscript troops should certainly not be running around all over the place whenever they get shot at. I never liked how so many of the battles in Shock Force 2 consisted of the western forces shooting the poor hapless Syrians in the back as they ran away from their positions over and over. Every battle would end in a slaughter. I've always wanted the AI in CM to be more likely to cower and surrender, and less likely to run away. Now it seems I've gotten my wish.
    If I put myself in the shoes of a Syrian conscript, handed a rifle, thrown into a hole in the ground and then told to fend off the invading army of a foreign superpower, I would probably not want to be running around outside. I imagine I would probably be like Sajer, cowering in the bottom of my hole soiling myself until enemy troops got close enough for me to throw my hands up and surrender.
    One of the first scenarios I played with the new patch was a CMSF2 scenario where you're British light infantry attacking a battalion of poor quality Syrian conscripts in a small town. Their poor quality made them easy to suppress with just small arms fire, and since they weren't running away, it made them easy to capture. Most of the scenario involved my slow, exhausted British troops lumbering from building to building in the extreme heat rounding up large groups of prisoners as they went along. I ended up taking more than 100 prisoners overall, more than any other CM scenario I've ever played. It felt very realistic honestly, kinda like what I imagine a lot of the early Iraq War to have been like, with US troops moving from position to position, and after some token resistance, rounding up groups of Iraqi prisoners as they went along.
  3. Upvote
    Bozowans got a reaction from Aragorn2002 in Buddy aid question   
    IIRC there is a 1 in 4 chance for a wounded casualty to die after the scenario ends if not buddy aided. So if you have four wounded men, chances are at least one of them will die. Eight wounded, two will probably die, etc. You just got unlucky with that one guy.
    It doesn't affect anything otherwise, but it can be fun to see how far you can keep your KIAs down during a scenario.
    Wounded casualties can also be killed during a scenario too. I've seen wounded casualties get hit by bullets and die, or get killed when an artillery shell lands right on top of them, etc. I've even seen pixeltruppen shoot wounded casualties on the ground and kill them almost like they did it on purpose. It can be kinda funny sometimes.
  4. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from John1966 in Buddy aid question   
    IIRC there is a 1 in 4 chance for a wounded casualty to die after the scenario ends if not buddy aided. So if you have four wounded men, chances are at least one of them will die. Eight wounded, two will probably die, etc. You just got unlucky with that one guy.
    It doesn't affect anything otherwise, but it can be fun to see how far you can keep your KIAs down during a scenario.
    Wounded casualties can also be killed during a scenario too. I've seen wounded casualties get hit by bullets and die, or get killed when an artillery shell lands right on top of them, etc. I've even seen pixeltruppen shoot wounded casualties on the ground and kill them almost like they did it on purpose. It can be kinda funny sometimes.
  5. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from Sgt.Squarehead in Infantry in buildings just won't die.. (and now they won't run away either..)   
    I agree with this 100%. The way you could just sit back and shoot enemies off of hard cover before was silly. In real life it could take hours just to clear out a single apartment building. 
    I'm reminded of the book The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. He remembered spending much of his time in combat cowering in a terrified, delusional stupor at the bottom of his hole, unable to react or do anything except lie there while the bullets and explosions crashed around outside. He wrote that a lot of his memories of combat were just a blur because of it.
    Green or conscript troops should certainly not be running around all over the place whenever they get shot at. I never liked how so many of the battles in Shock Force 2 consisted of the western forces shooting the poor hapless Syrians in the back as they ran away from their positions over and over. Every battle would end in a slaughter. I've always wanted the AI in CM to be more likely to cower and surrender, and less likely to run away. Now it seems I've gotten my wish.
    If I put myself in the shoes of a Syrian conscript, handed a rifle, thrown into a hole in the ground and then told to fend off the invading army of a foreign superpower, I would probably not want to be running around outside. I imagine I would probably be like Sajer, cowering in the bottom of my hole soiling myself until enemy troops got close enough for me to throw my hands up and surrender.
    One of the first scenarios I played with the new patch was a CMSF2 scenario where you're British light infantry attacking a battalion of poor quality Syrian conscripts in a small town. Their poor quality made them easy to suppress with just small arms fire, and since they weren't running away, it made them easy to capture. Most of the scenario involved my slow, exhausted British troops lumbering from building to building in the extreme heat rounding up large groups of prisoners as they went along. I ended up taking more than 100 prisoners overall, more than any other CM scenario I've ever played. It felt very realistic honestly, kinda like what I imagine a lot of the early Iraq War to have been like, with US troops moving from position to position, and after some token resistance, rounding up groups of Iraqi prisoners as they went along.
  6. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from Freyberg in A Criticism of Sound Contacts.   
    They seem to represent both sound contacts and tentative contacts. Contact icons will still pop up if an enemy tank is roaring around at high speed on the other side of a hill where no one has LOS to it. I've also seen sound contacts pop up for enemy infantry units that are very close by but with no LOS, like if they are right on the other side of a wall or something -- presumably to simulate footsteps and voices coming from the enemy.
    I agree that the game gives you way too much info about the enemy though. Like Erwin said, the CM1 games were much better about this. They would deliberately lie to the player about where enemies were, showing an enemy unit 50+ meters away from where they really were sometimes. If an enemy MG was firing from a cluster of buildings in the distance, you might not be able to tell from which building, or you might even be misled into thinking it was one building but it was really another. Then you would plaster that building with fire and blow it up, only to find the enemy was in the house next door all along. I loved the way the game did that, and it's a shame nothing like that ever made it into CM2. I guess it was too complicated for them to code that into the new engine where every single bullet and every single soldier is tracked in detail.
    Even aside from sound contacts though, the game still gives you too much info, even on maximum difficulty. If you click on a single enemy soldier you spotted from 2000 meters away, the game will still tell you whether he's from an HQ unit or not, or from an AT gun team, or whatever. Now that's just silly.
  7. Upvote
    Bozowans got a reaction from Bulletpoint in A Criticism of Sound Contacts.   
    They seem to represent both sound contacts and tentative contacts. Contact icons will still pop up if an enemy tank is roaring around at high speed on the other side of a hill where no one has LOS to it. I've also seen sound contacts pop up for enemy infantry units that are very close by but with no LOS, like if they are right on the other side of a wall or something -- presumably to simulate footsteps and voices coming from the enemy.
    I agree that the game gives you way too much info about the enemy though. Like Erwin said, the CM1 games were much better about this. They would deliberately lie to the player about where enemies were, showing an enemy unit 50+ meters away from where they really were sometimes. If an enemy MG was firing from a cluster of buildings in the distance, you might not be able to tell from which building, or you might even be misled into thinking it was one building but it was really another. Then you would plaster that building with fire and blow it up, only to find the enemy was in the house next door all along. I loved the way the game did that, and it's a shame nothing like that ever made it into CM2. I guess it was too complicated for them to code that into the new engine where every single bullet and every single soldier is tracked in detail.
    Even aside from sound contacts though, the game still gives you too much info, even on maximum difficulty. If you click on a single enemy soldier you spotted from 2000 meters away, the game will still tell you whether he's from an HQ unit or not, or from an AT gun team, or whatever. Now that's just silly.
  8. Upvote
    Bozowans reacted to Combatintman in Those jonesing for CM in the 80s will love this   
    You mean these badgers ...
    https://fas.org/irp/doddir/army/fm100-2-1.pdf
    https://fas.org/irp/doddir/army/fm100-2-2.pdf
    https://fas.org/irp/doddir/army/fm100-2-3.pdf
    So to answer your question ... yes 😉
  9. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from Falaise in Infantry in buildings just won't die.. (and now they won't run away either..)   
    I agree with this 100%. The way you could just sit back and shoot enemies off of hard cover before was silly. In real life it could take hours just to clear out a single apartment building. 
    I'm reminded of the book The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. He remembered spending much of his time in combat cowering in a terrified, delusional stupor at the bottom of his hole, unable to react or do anything except lie there while the bullets and explosions crashed around outside. He wrote that a lot of his memories of combat were just a blur because of it.
    Green or conscript troops should certainly not be running around all over the place whenever they get shot at. I never liked how so many of the battles in Shock Force 2 consisted of the western forces shooting the poor hapless Syrians in the back as they ran away from their positions over and over. Every battle would end in a slaughter. I've always wanted the AI in CM to be more likely to cower and surrender, and less likely to run away. Now it seems I've gotten my wish.
    If I put myself in the shoes of a Syrian conscript, handed a rifle, thrown into a hole in the ground and then told to fend off the invading army of a foreign superpower, I would probably not want to be running around outside. I imagine I would probably be like Sajer, cowering in the bottom of my hole soiling myself until enemy troops got close enough for me to throw my hands up and surrender.
    One of the first scenarios I played with the new patch was a CMSF2 scenario where you're British light infantry attacking a battalion of poor quality Syrian conscripts in a small town. Their poor quality made them easy to suppress with just small arms fire, and since they weren't running away, it made them easy to capture. Most of the scenario involved my slow, exhausted British troops lumbering from building to building in the extreme heat rounding up large groups of prisoners as they went along. I ended up taking more than 100 prisoners overall, more than any other CM scenario I've ever played. It felt very realistic honestly, kinda like what I imagine a lot of the early Iraq War to have been like, with US troops moving from position to position, and after some token resistance, rounding up groups of Iraqi prisoners as they went along.
  10. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from Bulletpoint in Infantry in buildings just won't die.. (and now they won't run away either..)   
    I agree with this 100%. The way you could just sit back and shoot enemies off of hard cover before was silly. In real life it could take hours just to clear out a single apartment building. 
    I'm reminded of the book The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. He remembered spending much of his time in combat cowering in a terrified, delusional stupor at the bottom of his hole, unable to react or do anything except lie there while the bullets and explosions crashed around outside. He wrote that a lot of his memories of combat were just a blur because of it.
    Green or conscript troops should certainly not be running around all over the place whenever they get shot at. I never liked how so many of the battles in Shock Force 2 consisted of the western forces shooting the poor hapless Syrians in the back as they ran away from their positions over and over. Every battle would end in a slaughter. I've always wanted the AI in CM to be more likely to cower and surrender, and less likely to run away. Now it seems I've gotten my wish.
    If I put myself in the shoes of a Syrian conscript, handed a rifle, thrown into a hole in the ground and then told to fend off the invading army of a foreign superpower, I would probably not want to be running around outside. I imagine I would probably be like Sajer, cowering in the bottom of my hole soiling myself until enemy troops got close enough for me to throw my hands up and surrender.
    One of the first scenarios I played with the new patch was a CMSF2 scenario where you're British light infantry attacking a battalion of poor quality Syrian conscripts in a small town. Their poor quality made them easy to suppress with just small arms fire, and since they weren't running away, it made them easy to capture. Most of the scenario involved my slow, exhausted British troops lumbering from building to building in the extreme heat rounding up large groups of prisoners as they went along. I ended up taking more than 100 prisoners overall, more than any other CM scenario I've ever played. It felt very realistic honestly, kinda like what I imagine a lot of the early Iraq War to have been like, with US troops moving from position to position, and after some token resistance, rounding up groups of Iraqi prisoners as they went along.
  11. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from Lethaface in Infantry in buildings just won't die.. (and now they won't run away either..)   
    I agree with this 100%. The way you could just sit back and shoot enemies off of hard cover before was silly. In real life it could take hours just to clear out a single apartment building. 
    I'm reminded of the book The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. He remembered spending much of his time in combat cowering in a terrified, delusional stupor at the bottom of his hole, unable to react or do anything except lie there while the bullets and explosions crashed around outside. He wrote that a lot of his memories of combat were just a blur because of it.
    Green or conscript troops should certainly not be running around all over the place whenever they get shot at. I never liked how so many of the battles in Shock Force 2 consisted of the western forces shooting the poor hapless Syrians in the back as they ran away from their positions over and over. Every battle would end in a slaughter. I've always wanted the AI in CM to be more likely to cower and surrender, and less likely to run away. Now it seems I've gotten my wish.
    If I put myself in the shoes of a Syrian conscript, handed a rifle, thrown into a hole in the ground and then told to fend off the invading army of a foreign superpower, I would probably not want to be running around outside. I imagine I would probably be like Sajer, cowering in the bottom of my hole soiling myself until enemy troops got close enough for me to throw my hands up and surrender.
    One of the first scenarios I played with the new patch was a CMSF2 scenario where you're British light infantry attacking a battalion of poor quality Syrian conscripts in a small town. Their poor quality made them easy to suppress with just small arms fire, and since they weren't running away, it made them easy to capture. Most of the scenario involved my slow, exhausted British troops lumbering from building to building in the extreme heat rounding up large groups of prisoners as they went along. I ended up taking more than 100 prisoners overall, more than any other CM scenario I've ever played. It felt very realistic honestly, kinda like what I imagine a lot of the early Iraq War to have been like, with US troops moving from position to position, and after some token resistance, rounding up groups of Iraqi prisoners as they went along.
  12. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from Freyberg in Infantry in buildings just won't die.. (and now they won't run away either..)   
    I agree with this 100%. The way you could just sit back and shoot enemies off of hard cover before was silly. In real life it could take hours just to clear out a single apartment building. 
    I'm reminded of the book The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. He remembered spending much of his time in combat cowering in a terrified, delusional stupor at the bottom of his hole, unable to react or do anything except lie there while the bullets and explosions crashed around outside. He wrote that a lot of his memories of combat were just a blur because of it.
    Green or conscript troops should certainly not be running around all over the place whenever they get shot at. I never liked how so many of the battles in Shock Force 2 consisted of the western forces shooting the poor hapless Syrians in the back as they ran away from their positions over and over. Every battle would end in a slaughter. I've always wanted the AI in CM to be more likely to cower and surrender, and less likely to run away. Now it seems I've gotten my wish.
    If I put myself in the shoes of a Syrian conscript, handed a rifle, thrown into a hole in the ground and then told to fend off the invading army of a foreign superpower, I would probably not want to be running around outside. I imagine I would probably be like Sajer, cowering in the bottom of my hole soiling myself until enemy troops got close enough for me to throw my hands up and surrender.
    One of the first scenarios I played with the new patch was a CMSF2 scenario where you're British light infantry attacking a battalion of poor quality Syrian conscripts in a small town. Their poor quality made them easy to suppress with just small arms fire, and since they weren't running away, it made them easy to capture. Most of the scenario involved my slow, exhausted British troops lumbering from building to building in the extreme heat rounding up large groups of prisoners as they went along. I ended up taking more than 100 prisoners overall, more than any other CM scenario I've ever played. It felt very realistic honestly, kinda like what I imagine a lot of the early Iraq War to have been like, with US troops moving from position to position, and after some token resistance, rounding up groups of Iraqi prisoners as they went along.
  13. Upvote
    Bozowans got a reaction from IICptMillerII in Infantry in buildings just won't die.. (and now they won't run away either..)   
    I agree with this 100%. The way you could just sit back and shoot enemies off of hard cover before was silly. In real life it could take hours just to clear out a single apartment building. 
    I'm reminded of the book The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. He remembered spending much of his time in combat cowering in a terrified, delusional stupor at the bottom of his hole, unable to react or do anything except lie there while the bullets and explosions crashed around outside. He wrote that a lot of his memories of combat were just a blur because of it.
    Green or conscript troops should certainly not be running around all over the place whenever they get shot at. I never liked how so many of the battles in Shock Force 2 consisted of the western forces shooting the poor hapless Syrians in the back as they ran away from their positions over and over. Every battle would end in a slaughter. I've always wanted the AI in CM to be more likely to cower and surrender, and less likely to run away. Now it seems I've gotten my wish.
    If I put myself in the shoes of a Syrian conscript, handed a rifle, thrown into a hole in the ground and then told to fend off the invading army of a foreign superpower, I would probably not want to be running around outside. I imagine I would probably be like Sajer, cowering in the bottom of my hole soiling myself until enemy troops got close enough for me to throw my hands up and surrender.
    One of the first scenarios I played with the new patch was a CMSF2 scenario where you're British light infantry attacking a battalion of poor quality Syrian conscripts in a small town. Their poor quality made them easy to suppress with just small arms fire, and since they weren't running away, it made them easy to capture. Most of the scenario involved my slow, exhausted British troops lumbering from building to building in the extreme heat rounding up large groups of prisoners as they went along. I ended up taking more than 100 prisoners overall, more than any other CM scenario I've ever played. It felt very realistic honestly, kinda like what I imagine a lot of the early Iraq War to have been like, with US troops moving from position to position, and after some token resistance, rounding up groups of Iraqi prisoners as they went along.
  14. Upvote
    Bozowans got a reaction from Probus in Largest Scenario   
    If you have Final Blitzkrieg, try "Day of Attrition."
    I don't know if it's the biggest, but it might be good for testing out hardware because of the huge map and the huge numbers of infantry. There aren't many vehicles but the Germans get two full battalions of Volksgrenadiers plus a few more platoons on top of that. It's so big that I couldn't finish the scenario because the whole game crashed and bugged out halfway through.
  15. Upvote
    Bozowans reacted to Sgt.Squarehead in SF2 - Non combatants?   
  16. Upvote
    Bozowans reacted to MOS:96B2P in AI never in attack.   
    This is an interesting topic.  I enjoy building scenarios and experimenting with the AI in scenarios.  The AI can't come close to reacting as a human but with the tools provided in the Editor it can provide a fun, interesting experience.  
    There are a combination of friendly triggers, enemy triggers, friendly armor trigger, enemy armor trigger, orders trigger and timers.  These, along with scoring/objectives, TOE, terrain etc. can be used in a combination of different ways to make the AI put up a good, interesting fight. 
    Reinforce an AI unit.  IMO the AI is best at defense.  In the CMBS scenario Tactical Operations Center I placed a friendly trigger behind an AI defensive position.  An AI reinforcement group was assigned to this trigger.  A few of the teams in the AI defensive unit were given poor morale.  If/when the player attacked the AI defensive position in strength at least one of the poor morale AI teams fled to the rear, hitting the trigger.  This triggered caused the reinforcing AI unit to respond.  @Sgt.Squarehead helped test this scenario and can speak for the effectiveness of this AI tactic.  If the reinforcing unit is not triggered it can still be useful sitting in keyhole positions covering an avenue of approach etc. 
    There are several variations of this AI tactic that can be employed.  One is to place an enemy armor trigger in the AI defensive positions.  In this case the AI reinforcement groups will wait to respond until the player is starting to overrun the position with armor.   Then a platoon of IS2s appear and counter attack etc.
    An orders trigger can also be used to reinforce the flank.  The AI defensive unit starts withdrawing when enemy armor (so enemy armor trigger) is closing with the defensive position.  Four orders into the withdrawal sequence is AI Group 11 order 5.  AI Group 11 order 5 is assigned as an order trigger for the IS-2 platoon to approach the original defensive position from the flank.       
    If we are building a scenario for single player only (my preferred way) we don't have to worry about Head to Head TOE balance.  IMO this makes things significantly easier.  A company of T-34 tanks can sit on the AI side of the map, out of LOS, waiting on a trigger.  If the trigger is never tripped this company of tanks will keep the AI from a premature surrender but may never fire a shot.  The player will only become aware  of them during the AAR map review.  IMO this is okay in certain circumstances.  
    In contrast that same AI group can be reused.  [A3] is a platoon of IS2 tanks on the east side of the map.  On a timer they attack across the map (through the player's positions) then hit an AI exit on the west map edge.  So most all of the [A3] tanks are destroyed or exited (an occasional one is still on the map immobilized).  Then 15 minutes later a platoon of AI controlled T-34 tanks spawn (show up as reinforcements) on the east map edge with the same AI group number [A3].  They again attack west or whatever the designer assigns them to do.  There are seven reinforcement slots, in addition to what starts on the map, to reinforce 16 AI groups.  I think I have used this in all my scenarios except one.           
    IMO it is easy to make the AI very difficult to defeat.  However, I don't care for difficult battles and prefer instead to have interesting battles with interesting command decisions that have both advantages and consequences. 
    As an example:
    I learned this from @George MC.  Do I call on the extra platoon of Tigers from battalion reserve?  These Tigers are also a 200 Victory Point (VP) spot objective for the Soviet's.  Calling them up to the front should provide useful fire power but will also give the Soviets 200 VPs.  Also the ground condition is muddy.  How many might bog/immobilize during the fight?   Is it worth it?  Decisions......
    Do I want to hit cease fire at one hour (as the scenario recommends) or do I want to fight on for an extra 30 minutes?  If I fight on for an extra 30 minutes the OpFor will earn 150 VPs (shortly after one hour an OpFor reinforcement will spawn on a 150VP touch objective).  But with the extra 30 minutes I could probably take the crossroads which is a 300 VP occupy objective.  Can I hold the crossroads against the expected OpFor trigger to counter attack until the extra 30 minutes is up?  Should I settle for a minor victory or go for the major victory?  Decisions...  
    Lots of fun interesting stuff can be done with the scenario Editor and the AI. 
    Below is a link to a new mini-campaign / scenario with the AI attacking.  I'm concerned the AI is to strong for the average player.  Waiting on partisans to finish it. 
     
          
  17. Upvote
    Bozowans reacted to MOS:96B2P in AI never in attack.   
    Here is another way the AI can be very effective.  The scenario Coup de'tat features the “OpFor Room” located in buildings throughout the map.  The OpFor room is a ground floor room with no exterior windows or doors where AI teams might be located.  
    The player will get tentative contact icons for some of the AI teams in these OpFor rooms.  Some of the AI teams will cause no problems and remain in their OpFor room the entire scenario.  Some of the AI teams will only come out if triggered and some are coming out (on a timer) to cause problems no matter what the player does.  The player has no way of knowing which one of the three situations a tentative contact represents and some of the OpFor rooms are empty.   
    It is impractical for a player to try and clear all of the OpFor rooms especially since many will never cause a problem (in game intelligence may report something in a specific building).  The player is forced to conduct operations while surrounded by this AI population.  Just as in RL he is never sure which one of these rooms OpFor teams might emerge from or when. 
    A lot of cool stuff can be done with this setup especially in urban terrain.  I originally used this technique in the scenario Tactical Operations Center.  However the urban terrain of Coup d’etat allows for much more widespread use.  Below are some screenshots.   
     
    As an example:
    1 = AI Group #1. This group will remain stationary (unless routed out by a nearby VBIED blast or airstrike etc.)  They will shoot at friendly units that enter the building but will not initiate activity. 
    2 = AI Group #2.  This group will emerge from their OpFor rooms to attack a target if the player hits trigger X. 
    3 = AI Group #3.  This group will emerge from their OpFor rooms and attack a target on a timer. 
    4 = AI Group #4.  This group will emerge to attack a target if the player hits trigger Y or on a timer whichever comes first. 
    Some AI groups will conduct operations, move to an exit zone and leave the map.  On a reinforcement turn the AI group will reappear with a fresh unit and conduct additional operations.  
     
     
    Above, various AI groups are shown in "OpFor Rooms" waiting on a trigger, timer or combination.  Some will never initiate movement from their location.   
     

    Above, exterior view of an "OpFor Room".
     

    Above, a police unit and their Canadian advisers, conduct operations while surrounded by an AI controlled population concealed in OpFor hide rooms.    
     

    USMC landing force exits the USS Wasp Assault Ship in order to conduct operations in the above mentioned urban area with OpFor rooms. 
  18. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from Freyberg in Target Priority and Historical Period?   
    FOG2 is a cool game. Pike and Shot is another great game, made by the same people. Fighting against one of those enormous tercio formations can be really intimidating. I suppose you could say tercios were like the Tiger tanks of their day. A giant square of thousands of men that just runs right over anything in its way and absorbs any kind of punishment you can throw at it. It's like a moving castle that lumbers its way across the battlefield.
    It's usually just a waste to try shooting at them, because it won't do anything. It takes a huge amount of concentrated fire just to have a chance at disrupting them, so usually your best bet is to ignore them or avoid them entirely and try to concentrate on the weak parts of the enemy lines, where you know your shots will have an impact, and hope you can rout them before the tercios can do much damage. Or you can win against tercios by winning the cavalry battles going on around the flanks. 
    WW2 doesn't seem that much different to me. A Tiger tank isn't going to do much good without infantry support, or without supply lines, or any of the other things it depends on. You don't win by throwing waves of troops and tanks into the Tiger's teeth for a chance at knocking it out. You win by avoiding it and calling in air support, or by concentrating on another area entirely and then winning on operational level maneuver.
    The Germans were so successful in the first few years of the war because they had mastered operational level maneuver. They had bewegungskrieg down to a science. They would concentrate their most powerful forces onto a single weak point, the schwerpunkt, and then punch through and encircle the enemy in a giant kessel. That's how they managed to capture four million Soviet prisoners in 1941. What they were doing wasn't anything new either. They were just following in the same Prussian tradition of the past 300 years going all the way back to Frederick the Great.
    The way to beat that is not by fighting against the enemy's strongest forces, but by avoiding them. The Soviets finally won by doing just that in 1942 during Case Blue. The Soviet armies didn't leave themselves to be kesseled this time and just ran away, leaving the German panzer divisions to wander aimlessly over hundreds of miles of featureless steppe, searching for prey that wasn't even there. Once the Germans got tied down at Stalingrad, the Soviets turned the tables on them and hit the Germans' own weak points - the Romanian armies on the flanks, and then pretty much won the war right there because of it.
    So I don't think things have changed much throughout history. The tactics are the same. I don't think ancient battles were much different either. A shield wall is a really strong formation and I don't you could beat it by just bashing up against it and beating them man for man. You would beat it by hitting weak points, like exploiting a flank or some rift that opens up somewhere, accidentally or otherwise. A weak point in a shield wall will eventually turn into a hole, and then a small hole will turn into a big hole, and then the entire formation will come crashing down and the battle will be over.
  19. Upvote
    Bozowans got a reaction from c3k in Shock Force 2 Unofficial Screenshot And Video Thread   
    I take too many screenshots. From "House Cleaning":
     
    Assaulting the compound:

     
    Firing squad:

     
    Platoon HQ pokes their heads out to fire into the compound:

     
    The Charge:

     
    And here is my absolute favorite shot. Here is your action movie poster:

  20. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from RMM in Concerns before buying   
    I've always had trouble close assaulting enemy vehicles. Infantry doesn't seem at all overpowered to me. They often miss their grenade throws entirely or the grenades explode in the air too early. They usually at least immobilize the target though.
    I just had a game of Shock Force 2 where my insurgents threw at least 7 grenades at a Stryker and still failed to knock it out. The Stryker then blew everyone to bits with its grenade launcher.
    Sometimes my infantry will do nothing but sit there next to the enemy vehicle for long periods even though they have plenty of grenades, and sometimes they will seem to pin themselves down with their own grenade explosions before getting machine gunned by the enemy vehicle.
    I have certainly seen infantry knock out vehicles with one or two grenade throws, but it's not very reliable. I find that I often have to swarm the vehicle with a lot of guys from multiple directions to reliably knock it out, and they will usually fail if they have any kind of suppression at all.
  21. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from IanL in CM:BN Screenshot Thread #2   
    The Khaki Hordes!
     






  22. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from Lethaface in CMA Unofficial Screenshot Thread   
    Storming the presidential palace

     
    Anyone play Grand Theft Auto? Where it says WASTED on the screen when you die? Well...

     
    This guy is DONE
  23. Upvote
    Bozowans got a reaction from Artkin in SPOTTING ISSUES   
    These games have always had weird and sometimes funny spotting issues. There's been a couple of times now when I've had units fail to spot an enemy tank in the middle of the street at close range, but they spot enemy infantry BEHIND the tank. Then my units start shooting at the infantry, only to have their bullets bounce off the enemy tank right in front of them that they still can't see.
    I remember another situation where I tried to close assault a buttoned-up T-34 during a night-time scenario. I had an infantry squad run up to the tank in the middle of the street so they are surrounding it. I told the infantry to literally go into the same action square that the enemy tank was in, so they could literally reach out and touch the tank if they could. Some of the infantry would have had to walk around the enemy tank to find a spot to lay down. The infantry proceeded to sit there next to the enemy tank for multiple turns without spotting it. I can't remember how many turns went by. Four, maybe five? In fact, the buttoned-up enemy tank spotted my infantry first! The tank went through that long delay cycle for acquiring targets at extremely close range and then machine-gunned some of my guys laying down right next to the tank. That was a real head-scratcher, that one.
    Every time I've seen weird spotting issues come up though is when units are at extremely close range. I've never noticed weird stuff happen at really long ranges, so that's interesting.
  24. Like
    Bozowans got a reaction from Uffest in SPOTTING ISSUES   
    These games have always had weird and sometimes funny spotting issues. There's been a couple of times now when I've had units fail to spot an enemy tank in the middle of the street at close range, but they spot enemy infantry BEHIND the tank. Then my units start shooting at the infantry, only to have their bullets bounce off the enemy tank right in front of them that they still can't see.
    I remember another situation where I tried to close assault a buttoned-up T-34 during a night-time scenario. I had an infantry squad run up to the tank in the middle of the street so they are surrounding it. I told the infantry to literally go into the same action square that the enemy tank was in, so they could literally reach out and touch the tank if they could. Some of the infantry would have had to walk around the enemy tank to find a spot to lay down. The infantry proceeded to sit there next to the enemy tank for multiple turns without spotting it. I can't remember how many turns went by. Four, maybe five? In fact, the buttoned-up enemy tank spotted my infantry first! The tank went through that long delay cycle for acquiring targets at extremely close range and then machine-gunned some of my guys laying down right next to the tank. That was a real head-scratcher, that one.
    Every time I've seen weird spotting issues come up though is when units are at extremely close range. I've never noticed weird stuff happen at really long ranges, so that's interesting.
  25. Upvote
    Bozowans reacted to DerKommissar in CMA Unofficial Screenshot Thread   
    Another Bug Hunt

     
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