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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/02/2018 in all areas

  1. There, fixed it for you, domfloff and Erwin
    3 points
  2. 1 point
  3. Falaise

    CM:BN Screenshot Thread #2

    A bucolic image of Normandy with cows resting under the shadow of trees ??? NO THE WAR IS HERE !!!!
    1 point
  4. You could do that as well, but you should know that a lot of people here are "realism junkies", myself included. Not against hypothetical battles at all, but a book full of maps depicting battles suitable for scenario making makes me salivate atleast.
    1 point
  5. IMHO, As someone who used to deal with ballistic missile stuff, that's MRVed (Multiple Reentry Vehicles), as opposed to MIRVed (Multiple Independently (Targetable) Reentry Vehicles). Yes, I know. Ballistic missile grog! Fascinating field expedient, though.
    1 point
  6. They are modeling their cool new Hugo Boss outfits - available in any color so long as it's sexy black or "cool as ice" green. Helmut is accessorizing beautifully with his Nikon binoculars and peaked cap. Perfect fashion statement for a morning stroll through Poland.
    1 point
  7. "Ach, it is die schweinhund Simon Cowell, open fire now boys."
    1 point
  8. AXIS ORANGE I have another scout team, made up of a recon team and an HQ unit (from Dog Company) deep on Axis ORANGE. Towards the end of this turn the STuG on this axis drove straight towards them... However, I don't think these two teams have been spotted, as the STuG appears to have turned between two buildings, appearing like it was simply trying to get a better angle on my defenders. I could be wrong as I lost sight of this vehicle right after this shot was taken, but it looked like it was starting to turn left. AXIS RED On Axis Red I decided to try to take a long range shot at one of the STuGs to my front. It is literally a long shot, but taking out or damaging one of these things now could really help in the long run, right Captain Obvious? My AT Team rushed across the danger area to the hedges on the other side... Once in position they organized to take a shot...note in the following image that the STuG's flank is facing my team. Unfortunately... the rocket hits the trees and the STuG keeps moving.. I don't think they ever knew they were threatened... Both STuGs ended up facing Axis Yellow and appear to be guarding the flank of the Axis RED infantry, which can be seen linking up with the STuGs on the right edge of this image:
    1 point
  9. I hate it when they do that! The degree of precision that CM demands of the player is a big part of what makes it such a remarkable game in my opinion. That'll be the battery commander no doubt.....If it is, and he's unbuttoned, a couple of light mortar rounds might be well spent in an attempt to bugger up the morale of his two minions out front. I know this battle already happened, just saying.....
    1 point
  10. Vickers Mk 11. A wheeled IFV with 14 dismounts and the entire turret from a Vickers VFM5 with a 105mm L7 mounted on top. It's somewhat unfortunately also the size of a house.
    1 point
  11. Heh, funny story there... I neglected cover arcs on some important units in this game and I come to grief over it, my stupid AT Team in the scout party fires a rocket at some infantry in the next minute for example... blowing the surprise and making them a priority target... there is a lesson in there for all of us to not get too complacent and lazy.
    1 point
  12. That's the best defence I've ever heard.
    1 point
  13. @DerKommissarregarding your question about whether the Saladin Armoured Car was a viable concept, the truthful answer has to be that it wasn't tested to its extreme. However nobody can deny that it was a versatile vehicle as demonstrated in the following image: Clockwise from top left, South Arabia (probably the Radfan), Northern Ireland, Indonesian Confrontation, Aden. These are just some examples of where it was used on active service with the British Army. By all accounts it acquitted itself well and was more than capable of dealing with uppity natives in the colonies and any neighbouring countries offering them safe haven and support. Had it been tested in a high intensity conflict with 3 Shock Army rolling across the Inner German Border, I suspect that if used in its reconnaissance role and handled well, it would have given a very good account of itself. It would certainly ruin any Soviet recce asset's day and was capable of knocking over APCs in service at the time and even the introduction of the BMP-1 doesn't really change that. The Armoured Car Regiment of the time was a pretty swept up organisation with an HQ Squadron, three Sabre Squadrons and an air troop for an all up strength of 30 x Ferrets, 24 x Saladins, 17 x Saracens and 6 x Sioux Helicopters.
    1 point
  14. Chudacabra

    AFV Show & Tell

    Aesthetically I love the Leopard 1, and the C2 looks particularly badass.
    1 point
  15. The Vickers Medium Mark I predates the Panzer III by over a decade, and had a three-man turret. The Swedes also made a prototype design with a three-man turret in 1934, which eventually ended up as Strv m/42. The Germans were not first with the 3-man turret, and it's hard to claim they were "ahead of their time" with it when the British did it over a decade before them. Panzer III is hardly the originator of the MBT concept, at least not any more than any other medium tank is. In fact, if any WW2 tank in particular can be said to be "the grand daddy of the MBT" (and I honestly don't think any of them truly can be), the British cruisers would have more of a claim than Panzer III, given cruiser tank development led basically directly to Centurion, the "Universal Tank". The Panther's side armor wasn't particularly thin by the standards of the time: both the T-34 and Sherman had about 40mm thick sides as well, and Centurion had 50mm. The shot trap was a problem, but all it took to fix that was adding the "chin" to the mantlet and it was a non-issue. Finally, the interleaved suspension achieved good flotation by reducing peak ground pressure (by spreading the weight out over more contact points), and also saved on rubber, which was a scarce resource in wartime Germany. It was a nightmare to take apart, especially if you needed to get at one of the inner wheels, and it liked to get all stuck together with frozen mud overnight, but for what Germany's requirements were, the interleaved suspension was really not a bad design choice.
    1 point
  16. A couple filtered pics of a lonely panzer.
    1 point
  17. 1 point
  18. I have noticed it for tanks in general, not just the Panther. I don't feel it is particularly unrealistic. Any penetration of the gun mantlet is likely to damage something important.
    1 point
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. In nearly 18 years of CM, I've never had quite this situation develop, but it was funny. After heroically destroying 3 Su-76M's with the Schreck and grenades, this landser and his partner shot it out with some Soviet crewmen. His partner went down, but they got all the crew. When the schreck tried to displace, he bumped into a Soviet ATR gunner. Fritz was quick on the draw and fired twice, but missed. He tried to hook it around the corner of the building, but the ATR gunner put a big slug in him.
    1 point
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