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General Jack Ripper

CM:FI AAR SLIM versus Bletchley_Geek

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Woot.

A point of clarification, however. You stated that you did not want to deploy your two HMG teams in Casa d'Antonio because you wanted them to have freedom of maneuver within their respective buildings.

Well, you -did- mention the 2.3 minute DEPLOY time. That's an estimate of how long it takes to setup in the buildings. So, yeah, it could take longer. To Deploy.

Underneath that Deploy time listing is something labeled "Pack Up". That's showing 14 seconds. So, you could have depl oyed the machineguns (and gotten all the ROF/LOS benefits, if any), and the packup time of 14 seconds would've been the only delay incurred to move them from one floor to another (or to the other side of that floor). They would've then been in the "semi-deployed" status.

I would highly recommend always using deploying when initially setting up in a building. FWIW.

(I just want to make sure the different time penalties for deploying and packing up are correctly noted.)

Also, as evident by the chain-reaction spotting/firing which unzippered your defense, setting covered arcs is always a good idea. Delete 'em later if you want. The units will still spot, they just won't fire. That may've preserved some of your firepower. Or not. ;)

Waiting for the next installment.

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, c3k said:

I would highly recommend always using deploying when initially setting up in a building. FWIW.

(I just want to make sure the different time penalties for deploying and packing up are correctly noted.)

I have had shockingly bad experiences using machineguns in the deployed role inside buildings. See my AAR against John Kettler. (Warning, photobucket debacle.)

Trying to get a deployed machinegun to fire on a target led to the gunner rotating, undeploying, moving, then deploying again, all while an entire company of infantry casually strolled past his Line of Sight. By the time he was set up to fire again, the opportunity was lost.

Yes, deploy and pack up are different. But if you are deployed in one direction, then try to deploy in another direction, you pack up for 14 seconds, then spend 2.3 minutes deploying again.
In my opinion, it is far better to remain semi-deployed at all times, unless you are planning to use the building as a semi-permanent position, or you absolutely need the elevation provided.

Edited by General Jack Ripper

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1 hour ago, General Jack Ripper said:

In my opinion, it is far better to remain semi-deployed at all times, unless you are planning to use the building as a semi-permanent position, or you absolutely need the elevation provided.

Wise words.

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1 hour ago, General Jack Ripper said:

I have had shockingly bad experiences using machineguns in the deployed role inside buildings. See my AAR against John Kettler. (Warning, photobucket debacle.)

Trying to get a deployed machinegun to fire on a target led to the gunner rotating, undeploying, moving, then deploying again, all while an entire company of infantry casually strolled past his Line of Sight. By the time he was set up to fire again, the opportunity was lost.

Yes, deploy and pack up are different. But if you are deployed in one direction, then try to deploy in another direction, you pack up for 14 seconds, then spend 2.3 minutes deploying again.
In my opinion, it is far better to remain semi-deployed at all times, unless you are planning to use the building as a semi-permanent position, or you absolutely need the elevation provided.

Hmmm. Gotcha. 

(I've gotta check to see if that behavior is still present. Not sure, since I (obviously) don't recall ever having seen it.)

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Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, c3k said:

(I've gotta check to see if that behavior is still present. Not sure, since I (obviously) don't recall ever having seen it.)

To be honest, that was back in game engine version 1.
Some lessons don't ever get "un-forgotten" though.

EDIT: The presence of trees or other obscurants partially blocking LOS, but not LOF was the contributing factor to the previous observation.

 

29 minutes ago, Warts 'n' all said:

Wise words.

 

I learned quite a few lessons as a result of that earlier experience:

Quote

I'd like to thank John for teaching me a few important lessons:

  • When placing an HMG inside a building, do not deploy it.
  • A position specifically built to be a decoy should never actually be occupied with troops.
  • Take note of the wind direction before throwing smoke grenades.
  • Sometimes confusion is better than clarity, especially when experienced by both sides. Learn to operate while confused, and you will act decisively at critical moments.
  • If you spend all your time fighting the A.I., the speed of a real human opponent's advances will catch you by surprise.
  • Maintain a stealthy observation of the enemy at all times, even partial intelligence is better than none.
  • Don't be afraid to sacrifice your men if there is no possible way to rescue them, it will buy you time to maneuver while your opponent deals with them.
  • HMG Section HQ's named Carstens are useless lumps who can do nothing but stare blankly into empty space through binoculars.

;) 

Edited by General Jack Ripper

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Posted (edited)

Our coverage of Casa d'Antonio continues as I react with my reserve platoon.

Some assumptions are made about enemy strength, and I begin to use my "spend bullets to avoid casualties" philosophy.

Edited by General Jack Ripper

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5 hours ago, Warts 'n' all said:

Well, I'm not bad as regicides go.

ahh yes I miss a good regicide.  Hasn't been one in a while that shows any real panache

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14 hours ago, Warts 'n' all said:

Purely by co-incidence I do live in the same town as one of the M.P.s who signed Charles Stewert's Death Warrant used to represent.

Really... coincidence?  And we are just supposed to accept that?

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You mean King Charles Stuart?  (At first I thought you were talking about Military Police executing some poor bloke called Stewart.)

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, sburke said:

Really... coincidence?  And we are just supposed to accept that?

OK so I got into the TARDIS stuck a pin in the Death Warrant, and it hit Andrew Broughton. I've never liked the word "REGICIDE" I was often tempted to change it to "HERO" in my youth.

Broughton plaque.jpg

Edited by Warts 'n' all

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