Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Yeah, it's kinda like saying that all modern (well, post WW2 anyway) tanks are basically copies of the Russian T-34 since that tank is what inspired the Germans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/23/2018 at 3:43 PM, mjkerner said:

Okay, grogs, have at it!

 

 

same people that made the movie White Tiger in 2012 which sucked and this will suck to. You can see right through it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, MikeyD said:

What did American do to all design ideas late war? Cast them instead of welded and added a turret bustle as a counterweight.

I have the impression that the bustle may have been more than just a counterweight. I think radio gear may have been situated there. It also may have provided storage for ready rounds as well as providing space for main gun recoil. All this is admittedly guesswork on my part as I have not made a close study of early postwar designs. For that matter, I have not found an abundance of printed matter that goes deeply into the subject.

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Michael Emrys said:

I have the impression that the bustle may have been more than just a counterweight. I think radio gear may have been situated there. It also may have provided storage for ready rounds as well as providing space for main gun recoil. All this is admittedly guesswork on my part as I have not made a close study of early postwar designs. For that matter, I have not found an abundance of printed matter that goes deeply into the subject.

Michael

A lot was for counter-weight to the weapon for overall turret balance. A solid bustle would have been...overkill. They were used to house radios and some other storage. (The US learned the value of this from the Brits. Early M4/M5 US tanks had no bustle. The Brits had them...and used them.) If the weapon recoiled into the bustle, the elevation would be very limited. (The trunnion mount to bustle distance would show the limits.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the Firefly, the turret bustle wasn't specifically a counterweight, it was to do with moving the radios somewhere where they wouldn't get crushed by the 17pdr's recoil.

Behold! From the mouth of Sir David Fletcher himself:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×