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On 7.2.2018 at 10:41 PM, IanL said:

m = e / c2

As in mass equals energy divided by speed of light squared.

 

That‘s a good one. Absolutely true, but probably not very helpful.

Reminds me to my Thermodynamics professor. After explaining for hours what entropy is, somebody asked „But what exactly is entropy now?“ The somewhat frustrated answer was: „I just explained that. Entropy is „integral dQ(reversible)/T“.

Edited by StieliAlpha

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1 hour ago, StieliAlpha said:

That‘s a good one. Absolutely true, but probably not very helpful.

LOL good point. All I can do is flip variables around correctly. I am absolutely no help figuring out how to actually create atoms out of energy. 

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16 minutes ago, IanL said:

LOL good point. All I can do is flip variables around correctly. I am absolutely no help figuring out how to actually create atoms out of energy. 

Don't worry. Currently it is probably more important to learn how to do it the other way round safely, anyway. B)

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9 minutes ago, StieliAlpha said:

Don't worry. Currently it is probably more important to learn how to do it the other way round safely, anyway. B)

LOL yes good point.

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On 2/7/2018 at 5:34 PM, John Kettler said:

We know that e=mc2, but if I want to convert energy into mass, presuming stupendous amounts of power are available, what does that equation look like, please?

Regards,

John Kettler

E=mC  is a derivative of  E2=[(m2)(c4)]+[(p2)(c2)]  I think you would have to have volumes of equations and transforms based on time, angles of movement and velocities of every quantum particle involved to achieve the answer... well there is no one equation. best answer goes to Sgt Squarehead. 

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IanL,

Thanks. Was hoping it was simple, not least because I wouldn't know how to type a complex equation into my manuscript!

Guys,

The subsequent disussion--what I could follow of it--was most edifying.

Regards,

John Kettler

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