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imo they are all useful in giving one the basics of how to conduct operations up to battalion level in CM2 or regimental level in CM1.  So, if you have little/no understanding of how to conduct a military maneuver, they are well worth looking thru.  There are even more useful videos available on uTube that give specific examples using the CM2 game.  Just Google.

However, one has to realize that for any game experience is required to understand and play the game system as all games have quirks, rationalizations, compromises to make the game playable. 

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Thank you. I have seen the youtube videos of Jeffrey Paulding and of Christopher Maillet. All very good stuff.
I have already read the FM 3-21.8 and 3-21.10.

But, I am still making tons of mistake. I am having difficulties building fire superiority. And, I always try to save my ammunition and I know this is not good.
I am just wondering if there are other must have FMs to read to improve myself.

I have found common sense is often the best tactic but it is not sufficient.
 

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Unless you're able to fully understand all of the concepts that are detailed in FMs, you're honestly better off not reading them. FMs are very dense, and what is written does not immediately translate into practice. Think of them like textbooks. Without the proper hands on classroom instruction, they are largely useless. 

My advice would be to watch the Jeffrey Paulding videos a few times through, understand what he is saying, and then try to emulate it. Remember, tactics are extremely simple. They have to be, after all they must be understood by terrified, sleep deprived, starving, miserable 19 year olds. The trick is always to keep it simple and not get lost in the nuance. There is a ton of nuance in FMs.

Put simply, all warfare (from the tactical level to the strategic) comes down to the ability to maneuver. You want to move, and prevent the enemy from being able to move. The way you do that is with fire. If you have fire superiority, it means you can move and the enemy cannot. If you can move, you can win. If you can't move, you can't win. Tactics come down to allowing your force to move. Then it's all a matter of dealing with problems as they arise. ATG down the road preventing your tanks from moving? You have to find out how to take it out, so that your forces can maneuver. This is where the nuance comes into play, and its easy to get lost in. Just remember, as long as you are keeping things simple, you can unravel the battlefield. 

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Re ammo expenditure, you'll get a feel for how much ammo your units will need through experience.  It will all get easier with experience. 

Many of us players have been at it for years and we still learn new things.  This is a complex and detailed game/simulation, so you shouldn't beat yourself up cos of errors.  Play the tutorials and/or replay some of the simpler/smaller missions until they don't seem challenging.  (It's recommended that you do NOT start one of the huge missions or a campaign until you get confident.) 

If you feel you cannot go on with a mission due to losses, you can always quit and start a saved game.  (Save your games every 5 or 10 moves.) 

 

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Field manuals as a concept are a good way to get you out of the mindset that you're playing a 'game'. Once you stop trying to game the UI limits and instead think about genuine tactical solutions to genuine tactical problems things will go more smoothly. Common sense advice like approach a cluster of buildings from their windowless side to avoid coming under fire. Oh, thanks for the advice, platoon-level infantry field manual!

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This doesn't really answer the OP's question, but here's my tuppence;

I read up on British Army doctrine of how AT guns were deployed and used during WW2 and incorporated that into a H2H game where I built my defence up around some AT guns.

Guess what happened?

...I got well and truly defeated (total defeat) because I was so focused on following the doctrine that I had ignored other aspects critical to the defence. Factors such as the terrain,  weather conditions and battle type had a much greater impact on the battle/game than me interpreting a field manual and trying to implement it in the game.

I think FM's give an insight into certain aspects and can provide a framework, but I would say far more important to success is playing the game and practicing over and over.

It's the same for real commanders, they can be the best student in their class during training, but only experience can make them great commanders. Some of the best commanders in history never had any formal training nor FM's to read.

I agree with @IICptMillerII keep it simple, master fire and manouevre, that's the name of the game!

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