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John S

Book - Battle Hardened

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Just a quick suggestion - if you have not read the recent book "Battle Hardened" by Craig Chapman, you really should.  I have read a lot of WW2 histories over the last 55 or so years and I cannot recall a book that gave me so much "real life" information regarding front line infantry tactics and weapons use.

The author's father served in the U.S. 4th Infantry Division and was on the front lines (except for the two periods when he was recovering from wounds) from D Day thru VE Day.  He was an officer who first commanded a mortar section, then a heavy machine gun platoon and finally served as commander of an infantry company.  The son has reconstructed the details of his father's service through summaries of his father's recollections, battle reports, letters home, interviews, review of Field Manuals etc.  In the process, he describes in detail the manner in which the squads and platoons used mortars, machine guns, artillery, tanks, etc. at the squad, platoon and company level.  He describes German tactics as seen by the US infantryman and the learning curve which brought increased use by the US companies of combined arms tactics and provides, anecdotally, a whole range of information on the methods and methodology of WW2 infantry combat.  In addition, the author provides an excellent description of his father's experiences and great examples of the sacrifices and dedication of the WW2 infantryman.  A very, very worthwhile read.

As I read it, I consistently had the reaction of ------ "Interesting how that reflects on how I should be playing scenarios in Combat Mission."

 

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One of the reviewers on Amazon compared this book to Charles MacDonald's Company Commander.  I will definitely download this to my Kindle.  Thanks for telling us about it.  

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3 hours ago, John S said:

Just a quick suggestion - if you have not read the recent book "Battle Hardened" by Craig Chapman, you really should.  I have read a lot of WW2 histories over the last 55 or so years and I cannot recall a book that gave me so much "real life" information regarding front line infantry tactics and weapons use.

The author's father served in the U.S. 4th Infantry Division and was on the front lines (except for the two periods when he was recovering from wounds) from D Day thru VE Day.  He was an officer who first commanded a mortar section, then a heavy machine gun platoon and finally served as commander of an infantry company.  The son has reconstructed the details of his father's service through summaries of his father's recollections, battle reports, letters home, interviews, review of Field Manuals etc.  In the process, he describes in detail the manner in which the squads and platoons used mortars, machine guns, artillery, tanks, etc. at the squad, platoon and company level.  He describes German tactics as seen by the US infantryman and the learning curve which brought increased use by the US companies of combined arms tactics and provides, anecdotally, a whole range of information on the methods and methodology of WW2 infantry combat.  In addition, the author provides an excellent description of his father's experiences and great examples of the sacrifices and dedication of the WW2 infantryman.  A very, very worthwhile read.

As I read it, I consistently had the reaction of ------ "Interesting how that reflects on how I should be playing scenarios in Combat Mission."

 

Just ordered it. Thanks.

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Hi,

On ‎17‎/‎01‎/‎2018 at 6:10 PM, John S said:

I cannot recall a book that gave me so much "real life" information regarding front line infantry tactics and weapons use.

Thanks for the heads up.. 

BTW. Stout Hearts by Ben Kite does the same trick. Great book, a click ahead of Closing With The Enemy by Michael Doubler, yet another great book and in its day the best of best on CM scale, WWII tactics.

 All the best,

Kip.

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