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Aragorn2002

German WW2 SS Camouflage Effectiveness

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No propaganda, just very interesting to see how these uniforms blend in an autumn landscape in Texas (I believe). They hide themselves and let you try to discover where they are. Really interesting.

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As a side note, I read some years ago that the US Army experimented with some patterned camo like the SS and the USMC and what they found was that as long as the wearers kept still it was effective, but as soon as they moved a solid olive drab was more effective.

Michael

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Interesting. Somewhere on the interwebs, there is a cool website which discusses modern camo, with some emphasis on how the brain interprets shapes. It's one of the Canadian camo manufacturers. Discusses Crye and their newer stuff and the US DOD camo competition. Hmm...

 http://www.hyperstealth.com/CADPAT-MARPAT.htm

Click around that site. They have some pretty interesting pages.

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8 hours ago, Michael Emrys said:

As a side note, I read some years ago that the US Army experimented with some patterned camo like the SS and the USMC and what they found was that as long as the wearers kept still it was effective, but as soon as they moved a solid olive drab was more effective.

Michael

One of my pals is an ex Royal Marine sniper - he says movement of a subject is always a giveaway - easier to spot em.

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2 hours ago, George MC said:

One of my pals is an ex Royal Marine sniper - he says movement of a subject is always a giveaway - easier to spot em.

+1 on movement reveals target...especially (for me) in thick wooded environment. 

Buzz

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3 hours ago, Buzz said:

+1 on movement reveals target...especially (for me) in thick wooded environment. 

It has always seemed to me that on average moving targets can be spotted about five times as far away as stationary ones out to the limit of visibility. The exact distance of course depends on a host of variables, some environmental, some to do with the target itself. For instance, stealthy movement is less likely to get noticed than someone who simply jumps up and starts running. Or the contrast between wearing camo and wearing Day-Glo colors.

Michael

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16 hours ago, c3k said:

Interesting. Somewhere on the interwebs, there is a cool website which discusses modern camo, with some emphasis on how the brain interprets shapes. It's one of the Canadian camo manufacturers. Discusses Crye and their newer stuff and the US DOD camo competition. Hmm...

 http://www.hyperstealth.com/CADPAT-MARPAT.htm

Click around that site. They have some pretty interesting pages.

I love this one.

image.jpeg.6fcc0e79503f206fc7f62c418746662b.jpeg

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The hillside and forest aren't hard to find. The grassy field I would guess the two light objects silhouetted in the yellow grass just to the left of the tree in the foreground, but then there's a 90 degree angle black spot to the right of the foreground tree in the tree line. Doesn't help the resolution has a couple black dots in front of the foreground tree in the grass. The picture with the rocks I had to look up. I'd chalk that one up with no freaking way cause of the resolution. Shooting wise for a sniper though all those positions in the pictures would be absolutely terrible.

The SS camo is pretty good. I think what throws it off if you were spotting non-moving potential targets in the same environment is that the tone of the camo seems to match the tree bark more but the curves of a human body stand out among all the thin tree branches.

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On 10/7/2017 at 11:39 AM, Michael Emrys said:

As a side note, I read some years ago that the US Army experimented with some patterned camo like the SS and the USMC and what they found was that as long as the wearers kept still it was effective, but as soon as they moved a solid olive drab was more effective.

Michael

Good memory. It was actually the same pattern you see the USMC using later on in WWII. I think it was called "duck hunter." Saw limited use in the ETO as well:

u-s-soldiers-in-hbt-camouflage-uniforms-

There was also the concern of friendly fire which cooled the use of the camo HBTs for the US Army. 

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1 hour ago, Rinaldi said:

Good memory. It was actually the same pattern you see the USMC using later on in WWII. I think it was called "duck hunter." Saw limited use in the ETO as well:

u-s-soldiers-in-hbt-camouflage-uniforms-

There was also the concern of friendly fire which cooled the use of the camo HBTs for the US Army. 

It was used in Normandy by one of the Armored Divisions involved in Cobra, as well as the 30th infantry. They got rid of it because of friendly fire, since camo was associated with the Germans.

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6 hours ago, Rinaldi said:

I think it was called "duck hunter."

According to Camopedia, "duck hunter" came to be used after the war for the general pattern of the USMC camo, which was called "frog skin:"

http://camopedia.org/index.php?title=Duck_hunter

http://camopedia.org/index.php?title=USA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frog_Skin

Anyone reading this who hasn't checked out Camopedia, well, should. :)

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LOL  Actually that is a really good example of how camo may look great/effective in a 2D image/photo when in RL the location of the trooper would be much more er... obvious. 

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