Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Battlefront.com

      Special Upgrade 4 Tech Tips   12/27/2016

      Hi all! Now that Upgrade 4 is out and about in large quantities we have now discovered a few SNAFUs that happen out in the scary, real world that is home computing.  Fortunately the rate of problems is extremely small and so far most are easily worked around.  We've identified a few issues that have similar causes which we have clear instructions for work arounds here they are: 1.  CMRT Windows customers need to re-license their original key.  This is a result of improvements to the licensing system which CMBN, CMBS, and CMFB are already using.  To do this launch CMRT with the Upgrade and the first time enter your Engine 4 key.  Exit and then use the "Activate New Products" shortcut in your CMRT folder, then enter your Engine 3 license key.  That should do the trick. 2.  CMRT and CMBN MacOS customers have a similar situation as #2, however the "Activate New Products" is inside the Documents folder in their respective CM folders.  For CMBN you have to go through the process described above for each of your license keys.  There is no special order to follow. 3.  For CMBS and CMFB customers, you need to use the Activate New Products shortcut and enter your Upgrade 4 key.  If you launch the game and see a screen that says "LICENSE FAILURE: Base Game 4.0 is required." that is an indication you haven't yet gone through that procedure.  Provided you had a properly functioning copy before installing the Upgrade, that should be all you need to do.  If in the future you have to install from scratch on a new system you'll need to do the same procedure for both your original license key and your Upgrade 4.0 key. 4.  There's always a weird one and here it is.  A few Windows users are not getting "Activate New Products" shortcuts created during installation.  Apparently anti-virus software is preventing the installer from doing its job.  This might not be a problem right now, but it will prove to be an issue at some point in the future.  The solution is to create your own shortcut using the following steps: Disable your anti-virus software before you do anything. Go to your Desktop, right click on the Desktop itself, select NEW->SHORTCUT, use BROWSE to locate the CM EXE that you are trying to fix. The location is then written out. After it type in a single space and then paste this:

      -showui

      Click NEXT and give your new Shortcut a name (doesn't matter what). Confirm that and you're done. Double click on the new Shortcut and you should be prompted to license whatever it is you need to license. At this time we have not identified any issues that have not been worked around.  Let's hope it stays that way Steve
    • Battlefront.com

      Forum Reorganization   10/12/2017

      We've reorganized our Combat Mission Forums to reflect the fact that most of you are now running Engine 4 and that means you're all using the same basic code.  Because of that, there's no good reason to have the discussion about Combat Mission spread out over 5 separate sets of Forums.  There is now one General Discussion area with Tech Support and Scenario/Mod Tips sub forums.  The Family specific Tech Support Forums have been moved to a new CM2 Archives area and frozen in place. You might also notice we dropped the "x" from distinguishing between the first generation of CM games and the second.  The "x" was reluctantly adopted back in 2005 or so because at the time we had the original three CM games on European store shelves entitled CM1, CM2, and CM3 (CMBO, CMBB, and CMAK).  We didn't want to cause confusion so we added the "x".  Time has moved on and we have to, so the "x" is now gone from our public vocabulary as it has been from our private vocabulary for quite a while already.  Side note, Charles *NEVER* used the "x" so now we're all speaking the same language as him.  Which is important since he is the one programming them
Sign in to follow this  
John Kettler

Russian MRE examined and eaten

Recommended Posts

Many of us are familiar with US MREs, but very few of us know about, still less have eaten, Russian MREs. Believe you'll find it of interest and possibly evoke a Pavlovian response. Sure did for me. Call this a different kind of flavor object. Ha! Am only half joking, for it would be a great thing to be able to strew on the map as desired. As an aside, I've now watched two MRE assessment videos in a row. Feel a kind of compulsion developing to watch more, since I find them engrossing in all sorts of ways, not least because what's provided reflects the culture it comes from. Found it hilarious he didn't know tushonka was pork. There's a thread in which I talk about how critical SPAM® and also produced by the US tushonka were to the Red Army. You can make your own, for the recipe is available online.

Regards,

John Kettler

Edited by John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The OIP was apparently an earlier generation Russian MRE. This is the latest. By latest, I mean 2017!  Maybe there's something wrong with me, but I found the OP far more interesting.

Regards,

John Kettler

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, John Kettler said:

The OIP was apparently an earlier generation Russian MRE. This is the latest. By latest, I mean 2017!  Maybe there's something wrong with me, but I found the OP far more interesting.

Regards,

John Kettler

 

Packaging is nicer but the content seems to be more or less the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FSB Mountain Ration (the real deal)

According to one comment to the video, this ration is only supposed to be eaten three days running. 

Russian soldiers do not eat these rations often, even when deployed abroad like in Syria. They mostly eat from field kitchens and mobile bakeries, so they are fed fresh pea soup, bread, potatoes, porridge, stews and so on. Plus, the rations are not supposed to be eaten for more than 3 days straight, even though it is definitely quite nutritious and it comes with a multi-vitamin supplement.
 
As you'll see, and this isn't Taras/Crazy Russian Hacker, but one RC Gusto, who's seldom seen, not terribly dynamic, but takes a much more nuanced approach and offers a kind of low level foodie take on flavors, aromas, and textures of the various foods. The Russians aren't messing around on feeding these men, with each ration containing 5000 calories, most of it from hearty fare, too.  On the other hand, when one of my brothers was at the USAF Academy in Colorado Springs for a time before getting a medical discharge, they were being fed 5000 calories a day, and he was losing weight like crazy. Guarantee you he wasn't doing mountaineering with full combat load, either, never mind combat. My point? It looks like a lot of high calorie food, but as hard as FSB guys go, they're probably still hungry.
 

Regards,

John Kettler

P.S.

Can't believe how many channels there are specifically about MREs!  Anyone know of a recovery program for people who binge watch this stuff? May need treatment very soon, but it's so much fun in the meantime!

 

Edited by John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5K Kcal is not that much. Half-marathon at descent tempo with no vertical gradient is 2K Kcal. Add this to baseline 2K Kcal and you're already at 4K Kcal. And that disregards low temperature / high humidity, mountainous terrain, additional gear weight and higher stress / faster metabolism / higher calorie consumption.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For comparison of standard (as opposed to SOF) field rations, take a look at what the Israelis provide as a 24-hour ration for four soldiers. Not only do I feel sorry for them because they have to eat so much tuna, but  I have to believe it makes them easy to detect by smell at tactically useful distance. This is a very strange ration which to me fairly reeks of insider connections. No other nation's combat ration remotely resembles this one. Be sure to notice the opening pictures.

Regards,

John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I notice the complete absence of any kind of bread in the Israeli ration, which seems unusual. I wonder if it is expected that the soldiers would have it available from a separate source. I agree that there is something fishy (hohoho) about that much tuna. A lot of olives too. Eating this ration every day would get really old really fast even if it is nutritious enough.

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael Emrys,

The marked absence of bread blew me away, but I didn't want to say anything, but instead, let the vid tell the bizarre tale. "Oy! Not one lousy matzoh they could spare?" The remark to the effect that bread would be supplied separately shows to me roseate logic over in the Quartermaster's Department of the IDF. For when, in history, has there ever been a case of a defending force running into supply difficulties, to the point men , en masse, even starved? Could never happen, right?

Regards,

John Kettler

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Michael Emrys said:

I notice the complete absence of any kind of bread in the Israeli ration, which seems unusual. I wonder if it is expected that the soldiers would have it available from a separate source. I agree that there is something fishy (hohoho) about that much tuna. A lot of olives too. Eating this ration every day would get really old really fast even if it is nutritious enough.

Michael

Crackers http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4941753,00.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW, the Army should start talking to NASA about rations. That agency has sunk a lot of resources into researching rations for the Mars flight as well as other long duration missions. I watched a tv program on the subject a few months back.

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Tuna is a godsend.  You know what tastes fine at room temperature?  Tuna.  You now what tastes good when you had the pouch in your cargo pocket on a ruck?  Tuna.  What's all right even when it's stupid cold?  Tuna.  Deployed, even with access to dining halls a lot of folks still stashed away those starkist tuna pouches because they were an awesome baseline nutritional item (if you worked on a FOB that had limited food options, it was a great fallback choice, or you just worked 36 hours, you need food before you go to bed sort of deal). I usually ate it straight from the pouch using a spoon, I often had other meal items squirreled away I used as sides (there were these little shelf stable cornbread squares that were amazing, also just saltines or sometimes tortilla chips), but I'll eat tuna for a week before I go straight MRE.

2. Which isn't to say MREs are bad, there's just the following basic math:

MREs are actually pretty good if you sit down, heat them up and eat at a human pace.  However if you have long enought to do those things, generally you will be given hot food.  

So as a result you're always eating an MRE at suboptimal conditions, either shoveling it down in 10 minutes before you move out, or as was often the case, eating it in little bits over the course of the next six hours of operations.  This adjusts what you prioritize in terms of value/desireability.  Example:

The Spaghetti and meat chucks is actually pretty all right, it's on par with pretty much any canned pasta.  However when it's air temperature you have zero time to cook it, and it's Twin Bridges Training Area ROK, circa January at 0345, it isn't appealing at all.  The cobbler that comes with it though, that's totally fine because fruit goop with some sort of crustish stuff tastes fine cold, and goes down okay in a hurry.  

Stuff that can be eaten quickly, or nibbled on and stuffed away without making a mess is highly valued.  Like you might get a bite out of the enchilada before you have to roll out, and there is zero way to keep that from becoming a mess in the turret if you've open the bag already, so you chuck it.  Any of the crackers, spreads, cookies, or similar snacky items are awesome though because again, you can eat those off and on all mission, and they're not going to be a problem (the cheese spreads have an almost religious following, but a lot of people will just suck those straight from the tube because they're small, taste reasonable, and are some obscene amount of calories).

If I had to name something I always ate, it was usually the crackers and spread, and I hardly touched the entrees just because I didn't have time, and there were enough calories in the rest of the meal to get by on our less than half marathon workload  
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, panzersaurkrautwerfer said:

Stuff that can be eaten quickly, or nibbled on and stuffed away without making a mess is highly valued.  Like you might get a bite out of the enchilada before you have to roll out, and there is zero way to keep that from becoming a mess in the turret if you've open the bag already, so you chuck it. 

I did the adult thing and just stuffed it all in my mouth and swished until I could swallow portions v0v

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

panzersaurkrautwerfer,

Have nothing against canned tuna, and it clearly is excellent for military use under all sorts of conditions. What blew me away was how it so utterly dominated the ration. A few days of that, an I wouldn't want to see tuna again for quite some time. If nothing else, there are other types of canned seafood available. Would be interested in knowing the shelf life of well packaged dried figs. What about straight up dates in strong packaging? 

Appreciate your take on the short course on food for soldiers in the field, what they eat, when and why. What are your thoughts on Clif Bars and such? No idea what their shelf life is, but have you ever taken any into the field yourself?  I see one of their primary virtues, for someone in AFVs, as being, notably in the case of the Chocoiate Brownie,  they don't crumble much. They take up little space, require no heating and are compact high energy sources. 

Regards,

John Kettler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, John Kettler said:

Would be interested in knowing the shelf life of well packaged dried figs. What about straight up dates in strong packaging? 

Those sound like good ideas to me. I should think a dried prune or two every day might be appreciated as well.

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/5/2017 at 11:43 PM, John Kettler said:

panzersaurkrautwerfer,

Have nothing against canned tuna, and it clearly is excellent for military use under all sorts of conditions. What blew me away was how it so utterly dominated the ration. A few days of that, an I wouldn't want to see tuna again for quite some time. If nothing else, there are other types of canned seafood available. Would be interested in knowing the shelf life of well packaged dried figs. What about straight up dates in strong packaging? 

Appreciate your take on the short course on food for soldiers in the field, what they eat, when and why. What are your thoughts on Clif Bars and such? No idea what their shelf life is, but have you ever taken any into the field yourself?  I see one of their primary virtues, for someone in AFVs, as being, notably in the case of the Chocoiate Brownie,  they don't crumble much. They take up little space, require no heating and are compact high energy sources. 

Regards,

John Kettler

My cat would greatly appreciate the canned tuna

IMG0028A.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×