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Ryujin

A couple questions about laser warning receivers

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Lasing generally precedes a killing shot by a second or three. The target reaction is generally swift. Sometimes it works, sometimes not.

Infantry "spoof" lasee against autocannon or 120/125mm airburst is a good way to lose that infantry.

shtora is 4 degree azimuth (istr).

This. I was taught by our master gunner to pull the trigger immediatley after getting a good return on a lase. Lasing was my last step in the process before "on the way!" IIRC the book says to have a good range before you announce "identified." But to speed the process up I would tell the TC "identified" as soon as I had the target aquired.

So "lase and blaze" was how we did it. I would not think the target could react in time to save itself from a tank gun shot. Especially a sabot round.

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ikalugin,

 

I found the qua techno music irritating and the remarkable use of unskinned wireframe, glass AFVs and, forgive me, bump mapping and strange particle effects to be rather conceptual, but the live demos were great, and that segment showing the LWR display was pure gold. Looks as though Shtora can identify the azimuth of a lasing event to a pretty narrow (relative to a quadrant detector), 7.5 degree sector or smaller (couldn't do the mental math in looking at the indicator). I'm impressed and would be interested to know what happens if the system's lased from two different directions at the same time?

 

Regards,

 

John Kettler

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ikalugin,

 

I found the qua techno music irritating and the remarkable use of unskinned wireframe, glass AFVs and, forgive me, bump mapping and strange particle effects to be rather conceptual, but the live demos were great, and that segment showing the LWR display was pure gold. Looks as though Shtora can identify the azimuth of a lasing event to a pretty narrow (relative to a quadrant detector), 7.5 degree sector or smaller (couldn't do the mental math in looking at the indicator). I'm impressed and would be interested to know what happens if the system's lased from two different directions at the same time?

 

Regards,

 

John Kettler

It gives you a warning and lights up two diodes at the same time? Probably rotates the turret to face a more recent threat.

 

Display accuracy for the frontal sector is 4.25 degrees I think.

Edited by ikalugin

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It gives you a warning and lights up two diodes at the same time? Probably rotates the turret to face a more recent threat.

 

Display accuracy for the frontal sector is 4.25 degrees I think.

 

Sounds like something someone posted upstream. ;)

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There are certain systems like the Abrams where there is no point in just getting a range.

Since as soon as you lase the gun is automagically ranged and leads the target.

If you lase nearby, it doesnt help you since you'd have to dump the lase in order to actually put the gun back on target and re lase to actually be able to shoot the target.

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There are certain systems like the Abrams where there is no point in just getting a range.

Since as soon as you lase the gun is automagically ranged and leads the target.

If you lase nearby, it doesnt help you since you'd have to dump the lase in order to actually put the gun back on target and re lase to actually be able to shoot the target.

 

I have no idea what you mean by this. Could you rephrase it?

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I have no idea what you mean by this. Could you rephrase it?

It makes sense to anyone who has played Steel Beasts.  Essentially when you are lasing against a moving target it calculates the lead as well as the range, so you really do have to "lase and blaze", otherwise there is a risk that the firing solution will not be correct anymore.  If you lase against a static position, no lead will be calculated so if your target is moving your solution will be wrong.  So you have to dump it out of the computer and re-lase.

Edited by Jock Tamson

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It makes sense to anyone who has played Steel Beasts.  Essentially when you are lasing against a moving target it calculates the lead as well as the range, so you really do have to "lase and blaze", otherwise there is a risk that the firing solution will not be correct anymore.  If you lase against a static position, no lead will be calculated so if your target is moving your solution will be wrong.  So you have to dump it out of the computer and re-lase.

 

Yeah, I've played Steel Beasts. And operated modern laser-based fire control systems.

 

If you lase a static position, it doesn't do anything to the lead at all, the laser only provides range. The necessary lead is computed based on turret's rate of angular change when the gunner holds his reticule over the target and paired with the (fixed) range number that the laser provides. You can dump lead and engage a second nearby target without needing to lase again, especially when firing flat trajectory sabot.

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