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dan/california

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About dan/california

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  • Birthday 05/11/1968

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    Male
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    Seattle

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  • Location
    california
  • Interests
    military/scifi/history
  • Occupation
    engineer

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  1. http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/americas-killer-m1-abrams-tank-now-has-its-own-shields-22720, A brigade of Abrams with APS makes the games backstory/equipment mix look a lot better, the Army must have gotten tired of waiting for the mythical American made "better" system.
  2. There is a lot of foliage around that LOF. That never makes missiles happy.
  3. I have been completely overwhelmed trying to sell one house and by another one, but a quick two cents. You need a 40 mm AGL kitted out with all the electronics for accurate indirect fire, or some way to pump out 60 mm mortar rounds at close to the same rate. Tie every squad leader in the unit in with an almost completely brainless way to call it in. Then all the Stryker has to do is hide. A dedicated vehicle could carry a LOT of rounds for something that size. Stick a mast on it so it can fire over convenient walls and small buildings by itself. The idea is to never show it to the enemy if you can help it. If the bad guys were dug in like badgers somewhere you drop low rate harassing fire on them for hours while you brought up something else. Go full rate and you could make an entire football field very unhealthy. Single rounds don't have a large collateral radius. Its COIN focused solution, but I pretty much agree with Herr Krautwerfer that the Stryker is a COIN focused platform anyway. That, or a burning wreck. My silly side would propose propelling said rounds with an electromagnetic system rather than gunpowder, but it would get lost in development He#%^^&# somewhere.
  4. So are the problems with the F-35, by and large. How is that working out?
  5. The green experience level pretty much covers it. They do NOT have a clue.
  6. The specific thing I was thinking about was Trophy's ability to give an azimuth to the threat on the FCS, and spread that through the net so the entire platoon or company knows which way to look. its a neat trick but it wouldn't be a deal breaker to leave it out of a crash install program. There were a few glimmers of the U.S. APS program in another thread a while back, but it is just really quiet overall, at least in public sources.
  7. In regards to the engineering involved in fitting Trophy to U.S. vehicles I would bet a fair amount of money that a lot of it has been looked at by the Israeli producer, and maybe the U.S military as well. There is a LOT of money to be made if Uncle Sam came calling in a hurry, and the systems integration work involved is something that can be estimated in advance, unlike the basic R&D of making the widget work in the first place. You need mounting brackets, you need electrical power and control wiring, you need FCS integration. Some of that isn't simple, but its not blue sky research either. Having a first pass at the various bits setting on a hard drive would save a LOT of time.
  8. On any reasonable interpretation of current trends every U.S. soldier whose primary job is to fire a weapon will have thermals by 2035. There is no point in paying the vast cost of deploying the U.S. military and not providing equipment that is so obviously useful. Likewise the only reasonable interpretation of why every U.S. armored vehicle doesn't have Trophy mounted currently is that some defense contractor has convinced some congressmen they can do better. Both systems are so overwhelmingly, and obviously useful the case for their deployment is overwhelming. It almost doesn't matter what APS cost, smoking wreckage is expensive too, and bloody useless as well.
  9. I think for most modern artillery the three single biggest sources of variation are atmospheric effects ( wind, density, and moisture all matter), propellant variation between shells, and placement of the round in the tube. Some systems measure the muzzle velocity of each round to correct for some of this as they go. The weather part can be very tricky because it matters for the entire path of the shell.
  10. There is thread after thread, and threads about the threads, all the way back to CMSF. The rather unpleasant calculus involved seems to be that its as much work as a full up module to do, and simply wouldn't bring in enough new sales to justify itself. The Pentagon can of course fix that any time it wishes.
  11. The other major element of the Soviet doctrine was to use units until they were used up. They planned that a battalion which carried out a major attack would simply be combat ineffective when it was pulled out, and wouldn't be combat effective again until it had been completely refitted and the the replacements trained up and integrated. The casualty levels in Black Sea imply this was not badly thought out.
  12. It compares remarkably well the experience of foreign volunteers in the Spanish civil war doesn't it? The side which shows up with more of this wins. " Artillery, tanks and infantry under united command dominate everything. No modern ATGMs in the proper amounts? You can chill in encirclement. Once the UAF accustomed a little war, it became clear that tanks rule in Donbass summer plains. " I must say the basic tactical rules of CMBS seem rather well validated.
  13. If the Chechens had had the missiles that Hezbollah was using it would now be an independent country, or perhaps a sheet of self heating glass. Hezbollah was READY, and much better equipped than anyone thought. If Trophy works as modeled though they will have less fun on the second go.
  14. http://www.marketwatch.com/story/what-an-iran-nuclear-deal-may-mean-for-crude-oil-prices-2015-04-02 Relevant breaking news. Nobody thinks oil is going higher, some people are predicting $30 per barrel
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